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Jefferson's call for nationhood [electronic resource] : the first inaugural address / Stephen Howard Browne.

By: Browne, Stephen H.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Library of presidential rhetoric: Publisher: College Station : Texas A & M University Press, �2003Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (xvii, 155 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1585448788 (electronic bk.); 9781585448784 (electronic bk.); 9781603446778 (electronic bk.); 160344677X (electronic bk.).Subject(s): United States -- Politics and government -- 1801-1809 | Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826 -- Political and social views | Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826 -- Language | Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826 -- Oratory | Presidents -- United States -- Inaugural addresses | Rhetoric -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 18th century | Discourse analysis -- United States | Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826 | Presidents -- United States | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Process -- Leadership | Jefferson, Thomas, (1743-1826) -- Pens�ee politique et sociale | �Etats-Unis -- Politique et gouvernement -- 1783-1865 | Jefferson, Thomas | Sprachanalyse | AntrittsredeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Jefferson's call for nationhood.DDC classification: 352.23/86/097309034 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
"Brethren of the same principle": the first inaugural address and the language of party -- "The strongest government on earth": the first inaugural address as political theory -- "The circle of our felicities": rhetorical dimensions of the first inaugural address.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveReview: "Widely celebrated in its own time, Thomas Jeferson's first inaugural address commands the regard of Americans from across the political spectrum as one of the great statements of the nation's libertarian tradition. Delivered as the young nation found itself embroiled in bitter partisan struggles, the speech has been hailed as the Sermon on the Mount of good government." "Curiously, this masterpiece of republican rhetoric - the full text of which is reproduced in this volume - has never received sustained analysis. Stephen Howard Browne describes the speech's origins, composition, meaning, and delivery. Browne's study explores how Jefferson's language and careful invocation of national symbols helped shape the cultural and political life of the period." "Through his careful and compelling analysis, Browne sheds new light not only on Jefferson's first inaugural address but on Jefferson himself, offering important insights to readers interested in the early years of the American nation. His well-crafted argument and accessible prose offer a model of analysis for rhetorical scholars and students alike."--Jacket.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 144-152) and index.

"Brethren of the same principle": the first inaugural address and the language of party -- "The strongest government on earth": the first inaugural address as political theory -- "The circle of our felicities": rhetorical dimensions of the first inaugural address.

"Widely celebrated in its own time, Thomas Jeferson's first inaugural address commands the regard of Americans from across the political spectrum as one of the great statements of the nation's libertarian tradition. Delivered as the young nation found itself embroiled in bitter partisan struggles, the speech has been hailed as the Sermon on the Mount of good government." "Curiously, this masterpiece of republican rhetoric - the full text of which is reproduced in this volume - has never received sustained analysis. Stephen Howard Browne describes the speech's origins, composition, meaning, and delivery. Browne's study explores how Jefferson's language and careful invocation of national symbols helped shape the cultural and political life of the period." "Through his careful and compelling analysis, Browne sheds new light not only on Jefferson's first inaugural address but on Jefferson himself, offering important insights to readers interested in the early years of the American nation. His well-crafted argument and accessible prose offer a model of analysis for rhetorical scholars and students alike."--Jacket.

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Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

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Other editions of this work

Jefferson's call for nationhood by Browne, Stephen H. ©2003
Jefferson's call for nationhood by Browne, Stephen H. ©2003
Jefferson's call for nationhood by Browne, Stephen H. ©2003
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