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Nuclear logics [electronic resource] : contrasting paths in East Asia and the Middle East / Etel Solingen.

By: Solingen, Etel, 1952-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Princeton studies in international history and politics: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2007Description: 1 online resource (406 p.).ISBN: 9781400828029 (electronic bk.); 1400828023 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Nuclear nonproliferation -- East Asia | Nuclear nonproliferation -- Middle East | Nuclear nonproliferation -- International cooperation | Security, International | Nuclear nonproliferation | HISTORY / Military / Nuclear Warfare | POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / Arms ControlGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Nuclear logics.DDC classification: 355.02/17095 Other classification: 89.76 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
pt. 1. Introduction and conceptual framework. Introduction. Alternative logics on denuclearization -- pt. 2. : East Asia : Denuclearization as the norm, nuclearization as the anomaly. Japan. South Korea. Taiwan (Republic of China). North Korea -- pt. 3. The Middle East : nuclearization as the norm, denuclearization as the anomaly. Iraq. Iran. Israel. Libya. Egypt -- pt. 4. Conclusions. Findings, futures, and policy implications.
Summary: Nuclear Logics examines why some states seek nuclear weapons while others renounce them. Looking closely at nine cases in East Asia and the Middle East, Etel Solingen finds two distinct regional patterns. In East Asia, the norm since the late 1960s has been to forswear nuclear weapons, and North Korea, which makes no secret of its nuclear ambitions, is the anomaly. In the Middle East the opposite is the case, with Iran, Iraq, Israel, and Libya suspected of pursuing nuclear-weapons capabilities, with Egypt as the anomaly in recent decades. Identifying the domestic conditions underlying these divergent paths, Solingen argues that there are clear differences between states whose leaders advocate integration in the global economy and those that reject it. --From publisher's description.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [351]-383) and index.

pt. 1. Introduction and conceptual framework. Introduction. Alternative logics on denuclearization -- pt. 2. : East Asia : Denuclearization as the norm, nuclearization as the anomaly. Japan. South Korea. Taiwan (Republic of China). North Korea -- pt. 3. The Middle East : nuclearization as the norm, denuclearization as the anomaly. Iraq. Iran. Israel. Libya. Egypt -- pt. 4. Conclusions. Findings, futures, and policy implications.

Nuclear Logics examines why some states seek nuclear weapons while others renounce them. Looking closely at nine cases in East Asia and the Middle East, Etel Solingen finds two distinct regional patterns. In East Asia, the norm since the late 1960s has been to forswear nuclear weapons, and North Korea, which makes no secret of its nuclear ambitions, is the anomaly. In the Middle East the opposite is the case, with Iran, Iraq, Israel, and Libya suspected of pursuing nuclear-weapons capabilities, with Egypt as the anomaly in recent decades. Identifying the domestic conditions underlying these divergent paths, Solingen argues that there are clear differences between states whose leaders advocate integration in the global economy and those that reject it. --From publisher's description.

Description based on print version record.

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Other editions of this work

Nuclear logics by Solingen, Etel, ©2007
Nuclear logics by Solingen, Etel, ©2007
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