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Layering of Size and Type Noun Constructions in English [electronic resource].

By: Brems, Lieselotte.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Berlin : De Gruyter Mouton, 2011Description: 1 online resource (424 p.).ISBN: 9783110252927 (electronic bk.); 3110252929 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Noun constructions | Language and languages | Grammar, Comparative and general -- Noun | Grammar, Comparative and general -- Case | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Grammar & Punctuation | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / SyntaxGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Layering of Size and Type Noun Constructions in EnglishDDC classification: 425.54 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Acknowledgements; Table of contents; Part I: Preliminaries; Chapter 1: Description of the topic and state of the art; 1.1 Description of the topic: Sort of a lot of size and type nouns; 1.1.1 Size noun constructions; 1.1.2 Type noun constructions; 1.2 State of the art: reference grammars and theoretically-oriented literature on size and type nouns; 1.2.1 Discussions of SNs in the literature; 1.2.2 Discussions of TNs in the literature; 1.2.3 Conclusions: a joint treatment of SN- and TN-constructions; Chapter 2: A cognitive-functional constructional framework for the English NP.
2.1 Requirements of a framework for SN- and TN-constructions2.1.1 Halliday's systemic-functional approach; 2.1.2 Langacker (1991): A radical functional account underpinned by dependency; 2.1.3 McGregor's semiotic grammar: Syntactic combinatorics in the NP; 2.1.4 Conclusion: An eclectic functional model of the NP; 2.2 A constructional framework of the English NP; 2.2.1 Elaborating the functional model: SN- and TN-patterns as partially filled constructions; 2.2.2 Background: From idioms to Construction Grammar; 2.2.3 CxG as a family of constructional approaches: General tenets.
2.2.4 A construction grammar approach to SN- and TN-patterns2.3 Conclusion: A dynamic model of the NP for SN- and TN-constructions; Chapter 3: Grammaticalization, delexicalization and subjectification in SN- and TN-constructions; 3.1 Grammaticalization, synchronic variation and emergent grammar; 3.2 Grammaticalization: Changing perspectives; 3.2.1 A morphology-based approach to grammaticalization; 3.2.2 Criticism of Lehmann's parameters and semantico-pragmatic approaches to grammaticalization; 3.2.3 A construction-based approach to grammaticalization.
3.2.4 Criticism of grammaticalization research3.2.5 Discussion and conclusion; 3.3 Grammaticalization of SN- and TN-constructions: From source to target construction; 3.4 Factors at work in the grammaticalization of SN- and TN-constructions; 3.4.1 Reanalysis and analogy; 3.4.2 Semantic changes, layering and persistence, (inter)subjectification; 3.4.3 Decategorialization: A positive interpretation; 3.4.4 Paradigmaticization: A dynamic interpretation; 3.4.5 Syntactic extension; 3.4.6 Coalescence and phonetic erosion; 3.4.7 Frequency; 3.4.8 Cyclical processes of renewal.
3.4.9 Lexicalization and grammaticalization3.5 Conclusion: Grammaticalization as functional and formal approximation of a target construction; Part II: Synchronic and diachronic corpus studies; Chapter 4: SN-constructions; 4.1 Introduction to SNs and issues overarching SNs and SSNs; 4.2 Description of the synchronic data set, selection of the SNs and method of analysis; 4.3 Head and quantifier constructions: heap(s) versus pile(s) and lot(s); 4.3.1 Heap(s) versus pile(s); 4.3.2 Lot of and lots of: Head, modifier and ambivalent uses; 4.4 Towards valuing (quantifier) uses.
Summary: On the basis of synchronic and diachronic data analysis, the volume takes a close look at the synchronic layers of binominal size noun and type noun uses (a bunch/a load of X; a sort of X; a Y type of X) and reconsiders the framework of grammaticalization in view of issues raised by the phrases under discussion. As a result, a construction grammar-approach to grammaticalization is developed which does justice to the syntagmatic lexical, or collocational, reclustering observed in the data within an eclectic cognitive-functional approach.
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Acknowledgements; Table of contents; Part I: Preliminaries; Chapter 1: Description of the topic and state of the art; 1.1 Description of the topic: Sort of a lot of size and type nouns; 1.1.1 Size noun constructions; 1.1.2 Type noun constructions; 1.2 State of the art: reference grammars and theoretically-oriented literature on size and type nouns; 1.2.1 Discussions of SNs in the literature; 1.2.2 Discussions of TNs in the literature; 1.2.3 Conclusions: a joint treatment of SN- and TN-constructions; Chapter 2: A cognitive-functional constructional framework for the English NP.

2.1 Requirements of a framework for SN- and TN-constructions2.1.1 Halliday's systemic-functional approach; 2.1.2 Langacker (1991): A radical functional account underpinned by dependency; 2.1.3 McGregor's semiotic grammar: Syntactic combinatorics in the NP; 2.1.4 Conclusion: An eclectic functional model of the NP; 2.2 A constructional framework of the English NP; 2.2.1 Elaborating the functional model: SN- and TN-patterns as partially filled constructions; 2.2.2 Background: From idioms to Construction Grammar; 2.2.3 CxG as a family of constructional approaches: General tenets.

2.2.4 A construction grammar approach to SN- and TN-patterns2.3 Conclusion: A dynamic model of the NP for SN- and TN-constructions; Chapter 3: Grammaticalization, delexicalization and subjectification in SN- and TN-constructions; 3.1 Grammaticalization, synchronic variation and emergent grammar; 3.2 Grammaticalization: Changing perspectives; 3.2.1 A morphology-based approach to grammaticalization; 3.2.2 Criticism of Lehmann's parameters and semantico-pragmatic approaches to grammaticalization; 3.2.3 A construction-based approach to grammaticalization.

3.2.4 Criticism of grammaticalization research3.2.5 Discussion and conclusion; 3.3 Grammaticalization of SN- and TN-constructions: From source to target construction; 3.4 Factors at work in the grammaticalization of SN- and TN-constructions; 3.4.1 Reanalysis and analogy; 3.4.2 Semantic changes, layering and persistence, (inter)subjectification; 3.4.3 Decategorialization: A positive interpretation; 3.4.4 Paradigmaticization: A dynamic interpretation; 3.4.5 Syntactic extension; 3.4.6 Coalescence and phonetic erosion; 3.4.7 Frequency; 3.4.8 Cyclical processes of renewal.

3.4.9 Lexicalization and grammaticalization3.5 Conclusion: Grammaticalization as functional and formal approximation of a target construction; Part II: Synchronic and diachronic corpus studies; Chapter 4: SN-constructions; 4.1 Introduction to SNs and issues overarching SNs and SSNs; 4.2 Description of the synchronic data set, selection of the SNs and method of analysis; 4.3 Head and quantifier constructions: heap(s) versus pile(s) and lot(s); 4.3.1 Heap(s) versus pile(s); 4.3.2 Lot of and lots of: Head, modifier and ambivalent uses; 4.4 Towards valuing (quantifier) uses.

4.4.1 Load and loads of.

On the basis of synchronic and diachronic data analysis, the volume takes a close look at the synchronic layers of binominal size noun and type noun uses (a bunch/a load of X; a sort of X; a Y type of X) and reconsiders the framework of grammaticalization in view of issues raised by the phrases under discussion. As a result, a construction grammar-approach to grammaticalization is developed which does justice to the syntagmatic lexical, or collocational, reclustering observed in the data within an eclectic cognitive-functional approach.

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