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It's Raining Cats and Dogs [electronic resource] : an Autism Spectrum Guide to the Confusing World of Idioms, Metaphors and Everyday Expressions.

By: Barton, Michael.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: London : Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2011Description: 1 online resource (98 p.).ISBN: 9780857005885 (electronic bk.); 085700588X (electronic bk.); 9786613527981; 661352798X.Subject(s): Autism spectrum disorders -- Patients -- Language | Autistic people -- Language | English language -- Idioms | Metaphor | PSYCHOLOGY / Psychopathology / Autism Spectrum DisordersGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: It's Raining Cats and Dogs : An Autism Spectrum Guide to the Confusing World of Idioms, Metaphors and Everyday ExpressionsDDC classification: 616.85882 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
It's Raining Cats and Dogs: An Autism Spectrum Guide to the Confusing world of Idioms, Metaphors and Everyday Expressions; Foreword; Introduction; Classic Idioms; It's raining cats and dogs; Getting the sack; You're pulling my leg!; He went bananas; To chicken out; A different kettle of fish; Stick to your guns; Feeling under the weather; I was over the moon; It's a piece of cake; You're burning the candle at both ends; It cost him an arm and a leg; Your ears are burning!; He's got something up his sleeve; Call a spade a spade; Going round the houses; Breaking the ice; In a pickle.
He's got the wrong end of the stickShortened Expressions; He had the sun in his eye; Put the kettle on; I feel like a pizza; Everyday Expressions and Sayings; He's driving me up the wall; His head is in the clouds; I've got some time on my hands; It's hard to get your head around it; To cry your eyes out; A square meal; He has a sweet tooth; He gave me a piece of his mind; My head was spinning; I laughed my head off; To have a face like thunder; I worked my socks off; It's not my cup of tea; We didn't meet eye to eye; He is all ears; To bend over backwards; That's how the cookie crumbles.
To grab the bull by the hornsI changed my mind; He went out with a bang; Double Meanings; The drinks are on the house!; He caught my eye; Catch the bus; You're fired!; Draw the curtains; Bear with me; Toast the bride; Metaphors; You've hit the nail on the head; You're winding me up; He flew up the stairs; He had egg on his face; The bread and butter; Splitting hairs; You took the words right out of my mouth; It's pouring down; I was like a dog with two tails; Put yourself in my shoes; To be under somebody's thumb; The ball's in your court; He knows it inside out.
He ran around like a headless chickenKeep your eyes peeled; To open a can of worms; Set the cat among the pigeons; Instructions and Statements; Take a seat; Hang on!; Don't rub it in; Keep your eye on it; To put your foot down; Cut it out!
Summary: The English language can be extremely confusing and illogical, especially for people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who interpret meaning in a very literal way. Why should an announcement that cats and dogs are falling from the sky indicate heavy rain? And what have chickens got to do with being a coward? It's Raining Cats and Dogs is a witty and stylish insight into the mind of someone with an ASD. It beautifully illustrates why people with ASDs have problems understanding common phrases and idioms that others accept unquestioningly as part of everyday speech. The quirky drawings will.
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It's Raining Cats and Dogs: An Autism Spectrum Guide to the Confusing world of Idioms, Metaphors and Everyday Expressions; Foreword; Introduction; Classic Idioms; It's raining cats and dogs; Getting the sack; You're pulling my leg!; He went bananas; To chicken out; A different kettle of fish; Stick to your guns; Feeling under the weather; I was over the moon; It's a piece of cake; You're burning the candle at both ends; It cost him an arm and a leg; Your ears are burning!; He's got something up his sleeve; Call a spade a spade; Going round the houses; Breaking the ice; In a pickle.

He's got the wrong end of the stickShortened Expressions; He had the sun in his eye; Put the kettle on; I feel like a pizza; Everyday Expressions and Sayings; He's driving me up the wall; His head is in the clouds; I've got some time on my hands; It's hard to get your head around it; To cry your eyes out; A square meal; He has a sweet tooth; He gave me a piece of his mind; My head was spinning; I laughed my head off; To have a face like thunder; I worked my socks off; It's not my cup of tea; We didn't meet eye to eye; He is all ears; To bend over backwards; That's how the cookie crumbles.

To grab the bull by the hornsI changed my mind; He went out with a bang; Double Meanings; The drinks are on the house!; He caught my eye; Catch the bus; You're fired!; Draw the curtains; Bear with me; Toast the bride; Metaphors; You've hit the nail on the head; You're winding me up; He flew up the stairs; He had egg on his face; The bread and butter; Splitting hairs; You took the words right out of my mouth; It's pouring down; I was like a dog with two tails; Put yourself in my shoes; To be under somebody's thumb; The ball's in your court; He knows it inside out.

He ran around like a headless chickenKeep your eyes peeled; To open a can of worms; Set the cat among the pigeons; Instructions and Statements; Take a seat; Hang on!; Don't rub it in; Keep your eye on it; To put your foot down; Cut it out!

The English language can be extremely confusing and illogical, especially for people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who interpret meaning in a very literal way. Why should an announcement that cats and dogs are falling from the sky indicate heavy rain? And what have chickens got to do with being a coward? It's Raining Cats and Dogs is a witty and stylish insight into the mind of someone with an ASD. It beautifully illustrates why people with ASDs have problems understanding common phrases and idioms that others accept unquestioningly as part of everyday speech. The quirky drawings will.

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