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From politics to profit [electronic resource] : the commercialization of Canadian daily newspapers, 1890-1920 / Minko Sotiron.

By: Sotiron, Minko, 1945-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Montreal [Que.] : McGill-Queen's University Press, c1997Description: 1 online resource (224 p.).ISBN: 0773513752; 9780773513754; 9780773565814 (electronic bk.); 0773565817 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Journalism -- Canada -- History | Journaux canadiens-anglais -- Aspect �economique -- Histoire | Journalisme -- Aspect �economique -- Canada -- Histoire | Journalisme -- Canada -- Histoire | Canadian newspapers (English) -- History | Dagbladen | Vercommercialisering | Zeitung | Kommerzialisierung | Geschichte 1890-1920 | Kanada | Journaux canadiens de langue anglaise -- 1870-1914 | Journalisme -- Canada -- 1870-1914 | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / JournalismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: From politics to profits.DDC classification: 071/.1/09041 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
1. Public Myth and Private Reality -- 2. Big Business -- 3. Publisher Power and the Rise of the Business Manager -- 4. It Pays to Advertise -- 5. Competition and Collusion -- 6. Concentration -- 7. Patronage and Independence -- 8. Joining the Elite -- 9. Interest Politics.
Summary: Minko Sotiron describes how, in their drive to maximize profits, publishers abandoned partisan politics and adopted sensationalistic journalism to build audiences for advertisers. He analyses the changes newspapers underwent in both content and appearance as the number of "fluff" pieces increased and hard news stories decreased, headlines became larger, prose became simpler, and illustrations and photographs became more abundant. From Politics to Profit highlights the increasingly powerful role of the press barons - Lord Atholstan, John Ross Robertson, Joseph Atkinson, Walter Nichol, Clifford Sifton, and the Southam family. Sotiron provides a case study of the first Canadian newspaper chain, which formed the basis for modern mass communication empires, and shows how the Southams contributed to the disappearance of independent newspapers in Canada.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [193]-209) and index.

Description based on print version record.

1. Public Myth and Private Reality -- 2. Big Business -- 3. Publisher Power and the Rise of the Business Manager -- 4. It Pays to Advertise -- 5. Competition and Collusion -- 6. Concentration -- 7. Patronage and Independence -- 8. Joining the Elite -- 9. Interest Politics.

Minko Sotiron describes how, in their drive to maximize profits, publishers abandoned partisan politics and adopted sensationalistic journalism to build audiences for advertisers. He analyses the changes newspapers underwent in both content and appearance as the number of "fluff" pieces increased and hard news stories decreased, headlines became larger, prose became simpler, and illustrations and photographs became more abundant. From Politics to Profit highlights the increasingly powerful role of the press barons - Lord Atholstan, John Ross Robertson, Joseph Atkinson, Walter Nichol, Clifford Sifton, and the Southam family. Sotiron provides a case study of the first Canadian newspaper chain, which formed the basis for modern mass communication empires, and shows how the Southams contributed to the disappearance of independent newspapers in Canada.

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From politics to profit by Sotiron, Minko, ©1997
Library, Documentation and Information Science Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B T Road, Kolkata 700108, INDIA
Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


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