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The ethics of Catholicism and the consecration of the intellectual [electronic resource] / Andr�e J. B�elanger.

By: B�elanger, Andr�e J, 1935-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Montreal [Que.] : McGill-Queen's University Press, c1997Description: 1 online resource (viii, 242 p.).ISBN: 0773515178; 9780773515178; 9780773566361 (electronic bk.); 0773566368 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Intellectuals -- History | Intellectual life -- History | Christian ethics -- History | Religion and culture -- History | Religion and ethics -- History | Catholic Church. -- Doctrines -- History | Morale chr�etienne -- Auteurs catholiques -- Influence | Morale chr�etienne -- Auteurs protestants -- Influence | Religion et culture | Intellectuels | Morale -- France -- Histoire | France -- Vie intellectuelle | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Social Classes | Intellektueller | Christliche Ethik | Kultur | ReligionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ethics of Catholicism and the consecration of the intellectual.DDC classification: 305.5/52 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
pt. I. Objective Justice and Its Demise. 1. Catholic Ethics. 2. The British Moralists: The Eclipse of Natural Law. 3. The American Assessment of Natural Law. 4. From the Clerisy to a Sparse Intelligentsia -- pt. II. The Rise and Fall of the Intellectual: The French Experience. 5. The Counter-Reformation and the Impact of Jesuit Pedagogy. 6. Lay Ethics within the Bounds of the Church. 7. The Philosophe: The Prefiguration of the Intellectual. 8. The Revolutionary Reading of Justice. 9. An Anti-Individualist Liberalism. 10. Positivism: The Path Leading to the Intellectual. 11. The Emergence of the Intellectual. 12. The Consecration of the Intellectual.
Summary: Using France as the most representative case of a Catholic context, Andre J. Belanger argues that as French society became more secularized intellectuals replaced the clergy as arbitrators of justice and enlightenment. Catholic morality was consolidated by the scholastic tradition and confirmed by the Counter-Reformation, providing the foundation that allowed the establishment of a lay elite. Belanger describes the progressive takeover of positions of influence by the new elite in Catholic society and examines arguments used by thinkers from the seventeenth to the twentieth century to legitimize their positions. In contrast, the Anglo-Saxon Protestant tradition, due to its emphasis on the priesthood of all believers, led to recognition of the individual's conscience as the sole judge of her or his deeds and failed to provide intellectuals with the basis for any claim to serve as moral leaders in political affairs.Summary: Encompassing a variety of disciplines, this study will be of interest to students of political science, sociology, philosophy, and history.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

pt. I. Objective Justice and Its Demise. 1. Catholic Ethics. 2. The British Moralists: The Eclipse of Natural Law. 3. The American Assessment of Natural Law. 4. From the Clerisy to a Sparse Intelligentsia -- pt. II. The Rise and Fall of the Intellectual: The French Experience. 5. The Counter-Reformation and the Impact of Jesuit Pedagogy. 6. Lay Ethics within the Bounds of the Church. 7. The Philosophe: The Prefiguration of the Intellectual. 8. The Revolutionary Reading of Justice. 9. An Anti-Individualist Liberalism. 10. Positivism: The Path Leading to the Intellectual. 11. The Emergence of the Intellectual. 12. The Consecration of the Intellectual.

Using France as the most representative case of a Catholic context, Andre J. Belanger argues that as French society became more secularized intellectuals replaced the clergy as arbitrators of justice and enlightenment. Catholic morality was consolidated by the scholastic tradition and confirmed by the Counter-Reformation, providing the foundation that allowed the establishment of a lay elite. Belanger describes the progressive takeover of positions of influence by the new elite in Catholic society and examines arguments used by thinkers from the seventeenth to the twentieth century to legitimize their positions. In contrast, the Anglo-Saxon Protestant tradition, due to its emphasis on the priesthood of all believers, led to recognition of the individual's conscience as the sole judge of her or his deeds and failed to provide intellectuals with the basis for any claim to serve as moral leaders in political affairs.

Encompassing a variety of disciplines, this study will be of interest to students of political science, sociology, philosophy, and history.

Description based on print version record.

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The ethics of Catholicism and the consecration of the intellectual by B�elanger, Andr�e J., ©1997
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