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The impact of international trade on wages [electronic resource] / edited by Robert C. Feenstra.

Contributor(s): Feenstra, Robert C.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Conference report (National Bureau of Economic Research): Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2000Description: 1 online resource (ix, 406 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780226239644 (electronic bk.); 0226239640 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Foreign trade and employment -- United States -- Congresses | International trade -- Congresses | Wages -- United States -- Congresses | Comercio exterior y empleo -- Estados Unidos -- Congresos | Comercio internacional -- Congresos | Sueldos y salarios -- Estados Unidos -- Congresos | Commerce ext�erieur et emploi -- �Etats-Unis -- Congr�es | Commerce international -- Congr�es | Salaires -- �Etats-Unis -- Congr�es | Rapport salarial -- �Etats-Unis -- Congr�es | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Labor | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Labor & Industrial Relations | Internationale handel | Werkgelegenheid | SalarissenGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Impact of international trade on wages.DDC classification: 331.2/973 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
And now for something completely different: an alternative model of trade, education, and inequality / Paul Krugman -- Effort and wages: a new look at the interindustry wage differentials / Edward E. Leamer, Christopher F. Thornberg -- Offshore assembly from the United States: production characteristics of the 9802 program / Robert C. Feenstra, Gordon H. Hanson, Deborah L. Swenson -- What are the results of product-price studies and what can we learn from their differences? / Matthew J. Slaughter -- International trade and American wages in general equilibrium, 1967-1995 / James Harrigan -- Does a kick in the pants get you going or does it just hurt? The impact of international competition on technological change in U.S. manufacturing / Robert Z. Lawrence -- Understanding increasing and decreasing wage inequality / Andrew B. Bernard, J. Bradford Jensen -- Exchange rates and local labor markets / Linda Goldberg, Joseph Tracy -- Trade flows and wage premiums: does who or what matter? / Mary E. Lovely, J. David Richardson -- Trade and job loss in U.S. manufacturing, 1979-1994 / Lori G. Kletzer.
Summary: Since the early 1980s, the U.S. economy has experienced a growing wage differential: high-skilled workers have claimed an increasing share of available income, while low-skilled workers have seen an absolute decline in real wages. How and why this disparity has arisen is a matter of ongoing debate among policymakers and economists. Two competing theories have emerged to explain this phenomenon, one focusing on international trade and labor market globalization as the driving force behind the devaluation of low-skill jobs, and the other focusing on the role of technological change as a catalyst.
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Contains revised versions of the papers presented at a National Bureau of Economic Research conference held in Monterey, California, on February 27-28, 1998.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

And now for something completely different: an alternative model of trade, education, and inequality / Paul Krugman -- Effort and wages: a new look at the interindustry wage differentials / Edward E. Leamer, Christopher F. Thornberg -- Offshore assembly from the United States: production characteristics of the 9802 program / Robert C. Feenstra, Gordon H. Hanson, Deborah L. Swenson -- What are the results of product-price studies and what can we learn from their differences? / Matthew J. Slaughter -- International trade and American wages in general equilibrium, 1967-1995 / James Harrigan -- Does a kick in the pants get you going or does it just hurt? The impact of international competition on technological change in U.S. manufacturing / Robert Z. Lawrence -- Understanding increasing and decreasing wage inequality / Andrew B. Bernard, J. Bradford Jensen -- Exchange rates and local labor markets / Linda Goldberg, Joseph Tracy -- Trade flows and wage premiums: does who or what matter? / Mary E. Lovely, J. David Richardson -- Trade and job loss in U.S. manufacturing, 1979-1994 / Lori G. Kletzer.

Description based on print version record.

Since the early 1980s, the U.S. economy has experienced a growing wage differential: high-skilled workers have claimed an increasing share of available income, while low-skilled workers have seen an absolute decline in real wages. How and why this disparity has arisen is a matter of ongoing debate among policymakers and economists. Two competing theories have emerged to explain this phenomenon, one focusing on international trade and labor market globalization as the driving force behind the devaluation of low-skill jobs, and the other focusing on the role of technological change as a catalyst.

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The impact of international trade on wages ©2000
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