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Northern experience and the myths of Canadian culture [electronic resource] / Ren�ee Hulan.

By: Hulan, Ren�ee.
Material type: TextTextSeries: McGill-Queen's native and northern series: 29.Publisher: Montr�eal ; Ithaca : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2002Description: 1 online resource (245 p.).ISBN: 9780773522275; 0773522271; 9780773569447 (electronic bk.); 0773569448 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Canadian literature -- History and criticism | National characteristics, Canadian, in literature | Inuit in literature | Myth in literature | Canada, Northern -- In literature | Arctic regions -- In literature | Litt�erature canadienne -- Histoire et critique | Canada (Nord) dans la litt�erature | Caract�eristiques nationales -- Canadiens dans la litt�erature | Identit�e (Psychologie) dans la litt�erature | Het Noorden | Mythevorming | Culturele identiteit | Letterkunde | Mythos | Literatur | Nationalbewusstsein | Kanada <Nord, Motiv> | Kanada | Eskimo | LITERARY CRITICISM / American / GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Northern experience and the myths of Canadian culture.DDC classification: C810.9/32719 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Introduction: A northern nation? -- Speaking man to man : ethnography and the representation of the north -- "Everybody likes the Inuit" : Inuit revision and representations of the north -- "To fight, defeat, and dominate" : from adventure to mastery -- Lovers and strangers : reimagining the mythic north -- Epilogue: Unsettling the northern nation.
Review: "In Northern Experience and the Myths of Canadian Culture Renee Hulan disputes the notion that the north is a source of distinct collective identity for Canadians. Through a synthesis of critical, historical, and theoretical approaches to northern subjects in literary studies, she challenges the epistemology used to support this idea." "By investigating mutually dependent categories of identity in literature that depicts northern peoples and places, Hulan provides a descriptive account of representative genres in which the north figures as a central theme - including autobiography, adventure narrative, ethnography, fiction, poetry, and travel writing. She considers each of these diverse genres in terms of the way it explains the cultural identity of a nation formed from the settlement of immigrant peoples on the lands of dispossessed indigenous peoples. Reading against the background of contemporary ethnographic, literary, and cultural theory, Hulan maintains that the collective Canadian identity idealized in many works representing the north does not occur naturally but is artificially constructed in terms of characteristics inflected by historically contingent ideas of gender and race, such as self-sufficiency, independence, and endurance, and that these characteristics are evoked to justify the nationhood of the Canadian state."--Jacket.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [201]-234) and index.

Description based on print version record.

Introduction: A northern nation? -- Speaking man to man : ethnography and the representation of the north -- "Everybody likes the Inuit" : Inuit revision and representations of the north -- "To fight, defeat, and dominate" : from adventure to mastery -- Lovers and strangers : reimagining the mythic north -- Epilogue: Unsettling the northern nation.

"In Northern Experience and the Myths of Canadian Culture Renee Hulan disputes the notion that the north is a source of distinct collective identity for Canadians. Through a synthesis of critical, historical, and theoretical approaches to northern subjects in literary studies, she challenges the epistemology used to support this idea." "By investigating mutually dependent categories of identity in literature that depicts northern peoples and places, Hulan provides a descriptive account of representative genres in which the north figures as a central theme - including autobiography, adventure narrative, ethnography, fiction, poetry, and travel writing. She considers each of these diverse genres in terms of the way it explains the cultural identity of a nation formed from the settlement of immigrant peoples on the lands of dispossessed indigenous peoples. Reading against the background of contemporary ethnographic, literary, and cultural theory, Hulan maintains that the collective Canadian identity idealized in many works representing the north does not occur naturally but is artificially constructed in terms of characteristics inflected by historically contingent ideas of gender and race, such as self-sufficiency, independence, and endurance, and that these characteristics are evoked to justify the nationhood of the Canadian state."--Jacket.

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Other editions of this work

Northern experience and the myths of Canadian culture by Hulan, Ren�ee. ©2002
Northern experience and the myths of Canadian culture by Hulan, Ren�ee. ©2002
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