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Cultural capital [electronic resource] : the problem of literary canon formation / John Guillory.

By: Guillory, John.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c1993Description: 1 online resource (xv, 392 p.).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780226310015 (electronic bk.); 0226310019 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): English literature -- History and criticism -- Theory, etc | English literature -- Study and teaching -- Case studies | Capitalism and literature | Literature and society | Canon (Literature) | Litt�erature anglaise -- Histoire et critique -- Th�eorie, etc | Litt�erature anglaise -- �Etude et enseignement -- Cas, �Etudes de | Capitalisme et litt�erature | Litt�erature et soci�et�e | Chefs-d'�uvre (Litt�erature) | Letterkunde | Canon | Engels | Litt�erature anglaise -- �Etude et enseignement -- Cas, �Etudes de | Litt�erature anglaise -- Histoire et critique -- Th�eorie, etc | Canons litt�eraires | Capitalisme et litt�erature | Litt�erature et soci�et�e | �Asthetik | Kanon | Literatur | LITERARY CRITICISM / European / English, Irish, Scottish, WelshGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Cultural capital.DDC classification: 820.9 Other classification: 17.80 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
pt. 1. Critique. 1. Canonical and Noncanonical: The Current Debate -- pt. 2. Case Studies. 2. Mute Inglorious Miltons: Gray, Wordsworth, and the Vernacular Canon. 3. Ideology and Canonical Form: The New Critical Canon. 4. Literature after Theory: The Lesson of Paul de Man -- pt. 3. Aesthetics. 5. The Discourse of Value: From Adam Smith to Barbara Herrnstein Smith.
Summary: In Cultural Capital, John Guillory challenges the most fundamental premises of the canon debate by resituating the problem of canon formation in an entirely new theoretical framework. The result is a book that promises to recast not only the debate about the literary curriculum but also the controversy over "multiculturalism" and the current "crisis of the humanities."Summary: Guillory argues that canon formation must be understood less as a question of representing social groups in the canon than of distributing "cultural capital" in the schools, which regulate access to literacy, the practices of reading and writing. He declines to reduce the history of canon formation to one of individual reputations or the ideological contents of particular works, arguing that a critique of the canon fixated on the concept of authorial identity overlooks historical transformations in the forms of cultural capital that have underwritten judgments of individual authors. The most important of these transformations is the emergence of "literature" in the later eighteenth century as the name of the cultural capital of the bourgeoisie.Summary: In three case studies, Guillory charts the rise and decline of the category of "literature" as the organizing principle of canon formation in the modern period. He considers the institutionalization of the English vernacular canon in eighteenth-century primary schools; the polemic on behalf of a New Critical modernist canon in the university; and the appearance of a "canon of theory" supplementing the literary curriculum in the graduate schools and marking the onset of a terminal crisis of literature as the dominant form of cultural capital in the schools.Summary: The final chapter of Cultural Capital examines recent theories of value judgment, which have strongly reaffirmed cultural relativism as the necessary implication of canon critique. Contrasting the relativist position with Pierre Bourdieu's very different sociology of judgment, Guillory concludes that the object of a revisionary critique of aesthetic evaluation should not be to discredit judgment, but to reform the conditions of its practice in the schools by universalizing access to the means of literary production and consumption.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 341-383) and index.

Description based on print version record.

pt. 1. Critique. 1. Canonical and Noncanonical: The Current Debate -- pt. 2. Case Studies. 2. Mute Inglorious Miltons: Gray, Wordsworth, and the Vernacular Canon. 3. Ideology and Canonical Form: The New Critical Canon. 4. Literature after Theory: The Lesson of Paul de Man -- pt. 3. Aesthetics. 5. The Discourse of Value: From Adam Smith to Barbara Herrnstein Smith.

In Cultural Capital, John Guillory challenges the most fundamental premises of the canon debate by resituating the problem of canon formation in an entirely new theoretical framework. The result is a book that promises to recast not only the debate about the literary curriculum but also the controversy over "multiculturalism" and the current "crisis of the humanities."

Guillory argues that canon formation must be understood less as a question of representing social groups in the canon than of distributing "cultural capital" in the schools, which regulate access to literacy, the practices of reading and writing. He declines to reduce the history of canon formation to one of individual reputations or the ideological contents of particular works, arguing that a critique of the canon fixated on the concept of authorial identity overlooks historical transformations in the forms of cultural capital that have underwritten judgments of individual authors. The most important of these transformations is the emergence of "literature" in the later eighteenth century as the name of the cultural capital of the bourgeoisie.

In three case studies, Guillory charts the rise and decline of the category of "literature" as the organizing principle of canon formation in the modern period. He considers the institutionalization of the English vernacular canon in eighteenth-century primary schools; the polemic on behalf of a New Critical modernist canon in the university; and the appearance of a "canon of theory" supplementing the literary curriculum in the graduate schools and marking the onset of a terminal crisis of literature as the dominant form of cultural capital in the schools.

The final chapter of Cultural Capital examines recent theories of value judgment, which have strongly reaffirmed cultural relativism as the necessary implication of canon critique. Contrasting the relativist position with Pierre Bourdieu's very different sociology of judgment, Guillory concludes that the object of a revisionary critique of aesthetic evaluation should not be to discredit judgment, but to reform the conditions of its practice in the schools by universalizing access to the means of literary production and consumption.

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Other editions of this work

Cultural capital by Guillory, John. ©1993
Cultural capital by Guillory, John. ©1993
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