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No undocumented child left behind [electronic resource] : Plyler v. Doe and the education of undocumented schoolchildren / Michael A. Olivas.

By: Olivas, Michael A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Citizenship and migration in the Americas: Publisher: New York : New York University Press, c2012Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 193 p.).ISBN: 081476245X (electronic bk.); 9780814762455 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Children of illegal aliens -- Education -- Law and legislation -- United States | LAW / Administrative Law & Regulatory PracticeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: No undocumented child left behind.DDC classification: 344.73/0791 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Why Plyler matters -- The story of Plyler v. Doe : the education of undocumented children, and the polity -- The implementation of Plyler v. Doe -- The political economy of the DREAM Act and the legislative process : Doe goes to college -- Conclusion : the discourse and the danger (or, why Plyler should have been decided on preemption grounds).
Summary: The 1982 U. S. Supreme Court case of Plyler v. Doe, which made it possible for undocumented children to enroll in Texas public schools, was a watershed moment for immigrant rights in the United States. The Court struck down both a state statute denying funding for education to undocumented children and a municipal school district's attempt to charge an annual 1,000 tuition fee for each undocumented student to compensate for the lost state funding. Yet while this case has not returned to the Supreme Court, it is frequently contested at the state and local level. In No Undocumented Child Left Be
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Why Plyler matters -- The story of Plyler v. Doe : the education of undocumented children, and the polity -- The implementation of Plyler v. Doe -- The political economy of the DREAM Act and the legislative process : Doe goes to college -- Conclusion : the discourse and the danger (or, why Plyler should have been decided on preemption grounds).

The 1982 U. S. Supreme Court case of Plyler v. Doe, which made it possible for undocumented children to enroll in Texas public schools, was a watershed moment for immigrant rights in the United States. The Court struck down both a state statute denying funding for education to undocumented children and a municipal school district's attempt to charge an annual 1,000 tuition fee for each undocumented student to compensate for the lost state funding. Yet while this case has not returned to the Supreme Court, it is frequently contested at the state and local level. In No Undocumented Child Left Be

Description based on online resource; title from home title page ( New York University Press, viewed on May 22, 2012)

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Other editions of this work

No undocumented child left behind by Olivas, Michael A. ©2012
No undocumented child left behind by Olivas, Michael A. ©2012
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