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Sing unto God a new song [electronic resource] : a contemporary reading of the Psalms / Herbert J. Levine.

By: Levine, Herbert J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Indiana studies in biblical literature: Publisher: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1995Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 279 p.) : ill.ISBN: 0585108846 (electronic bk.); 9780585108841 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Bible. Psalms -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- Old Testament | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- Wisdom Literature | Electronic booksGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sing unto God a new song.DDC classification: 223/.206 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
From tradition to modernity: toward a contemporary approach to the Psalms -- The world of the Psalms: the perspective of ritual -- An audience with the king: the perspective of dialogue -- From here to eternity: the perspectives of time and space -- Through the valley of the shadow of death and beyond: the Psalms and Jewish national catastrophe.
Summary: In his remarkable studies of the Psalms, Herbert J. Levine draws upon a variety of critical perspectives to explore the Psalms, including the anthropology of ritual, speech-act theory, religious phenomenology, midrashic hermeneutics, and post-Holocaust theology. In Levine's readings, the psalmists are revealed as our spiritual contemporaries in their struggle to wrest meaning out of a world that they saw as filled with both senseless violence and redemptive love.Summary: Invoking Buber's and Bakhtin's discussions of dialogue as the fundamental social and religious act, and J. L. Austin's theory of speech acts and performative language, Levine illuminates the urgent rhetorical strategies of the psalmists as they solicit responses from a God hidden in a world of suffering and evil. In seeking to reconcile faith in God and experience of unjust evil, the psalmists' representation of deliverance is of central importance. Using the religious phenomenology of Eliade, Levine examines how the psalmists' sense of their own lives interacted with idealized notions of sacred time and space.Summary: Levine concludes with an essay in historical theology. He shows how the Psalms have been used by each generation responding to the most significant Jewish national tragedies. By showing how the Psalms have lived and changed from the destruction of the First Temple to our own post-Holocaust moment, Levine offers contemporary readers a model of how a religious tradition survives and adapts by engaging in an extended dialogue with its own sacred traditions.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-272) and indexes.

In his remarkable studies of the Psalms, Herbert J. Levine draws upon a variety of critical perspectives to explore the Psalms, including the anthropology of ritual, speech-act theory, religious phenomenology, midrashic hermeneutics, and post-Holocaust theology. In Levine's readings, the psalmists are revealed as our spiritual contemporaries in their struggle to wrest meaning out of a world that they saw as filled with both senseless violence and redemptive love.

Invoking Buber's and Bakhtin's discussions of dialogue as the fundamental social and religious act, and J. L. Austin's theory of speech acts and performative language, Levine illuminates the urgent rhetorical strategies of the psalmists as they solicit responses from a God hidden in a world of suffering and evil. In seeking to reconcile faith in God and experience of unjust evil, the psalmists' representation of deliverance is of central importance. Using the religious phenomenology of Eliade, Levine examines how the psalmists' sense of their own lives interacted with idealized notions of sacred time and space.

Levine concludes with an essay in historical theology. He shows how the Psalms have been used by each generation responding to the most significant Jewish national tragedies. By showing how the Psalms have lived and changed from the destruction of the First Temple to our own post-Holocaust moment, Levine offers contemporary readers a model of how a religious tradition survives and adapts by engaging in an extended dialogue with its own sacred traditions.

From tradition to modernity: toward a contemporary approach to the Psalms -- The world of the Psalms: the perspective of ritual -- An audience with the king: the perspective of dialogue -- From here to eternity: the perspectives of time and space -- Through the valley of the shadow of death and beyond: the Psalms and Jewish national catastrophe.

Description based on print version record.

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