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Allocating scholarships for Army ROTC [electronic resource] / Charles A. Goldman, Michael G. Mattock ; with Joann Davis ... [et al.].

By: Goldman, Charles A, 1964-.
Contributor(s): Mattock, Michael G, 1961- | Arroyo Center.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Internet resource: ; Online Rand research documents: Publisher: Santa Monica, Calif. : RAND, 1999Description: 1 online resource (xix, 62 p.) : ill.ISBN: 0585245495 (electronic bk.); 9780585245492 (electronic bk.); 9780833027467; 0833027468.Subject(s): United States. Army. Reserve Officers' Training Corps | College students -- Scholarships, fellowships, etc. -- United States | Military art and science -- Scholarships, fellowships, etc. -- United States | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING -- Military Science | HISTORY -- Military -- Other | Electronic booksGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Allocating scholarships for Army ROTC.DDC classification: 355.2/232/071173 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Introduction -- ROTC and Changes in College Financial Aid -- Lessons from Past Scholarship Programs -- Cost of Attracting Students -- Scholarship Plans for the Future -- Conclusions -- Appendix A: Modeling the Acceptance Rate of Four-Year-ROTC Scholarships -- Appendix B: Computing Officer Retention -- Appendix C: Tier IA Scholarship Analysis and Implementation -- Appendix D: Interview Protocols.
Summary: In the face of rising tuition costs and the increased importance of scholarships to meeting its commission mission, the Army designed a new scholarship program, known as the tiered scholarship program because it offered four different scholarship values (called tiers). Under the new program, enrollments at public colleges increased modestly and the Army controlled the total scholarship cost. But as feared, many fewer of the nation's most academically able students enrolled in ROTC, and the programs at the nation's most prestigious private colleges and universities were facing the prospect of closure. Based on these findings, the authors recommended and the Army implemented a high-value scholarship targeted to some prestigious private colleges. The study also analyzes several complete scholarship programs to replace the tiered scholarships. The analysis supports plans that continue to offer high-value scholarships at some prestigious private schools, while offering lower values at other schools. Although it would entail some significant tradeoffs, the authors have also presented a plan that would offer greater values to in-state students at public schools--a large potential market, especially if tuition increases in the private schools do not abate in the decade ahead. These offers would require congressional approval because the law currently prohibits the use of scholarships for room and board, which constitute the largest portion of these in-state students' expenses to attend college.
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"MR-1069-A."

"Prepared for the United States Army."

"Arroyo Center."

Includes bibliographical references (p. 61-62).

Description based on print version record.

Introduction -- ROTC and Changes in College Financial Aid -- Lessons from Past Scholarship Programs -- Cost of Attracting Students -- Scholarship Plans for the Future -- Conclusions -- Appendix A: Modeling the Acceptance Rate of Four-Year-ROTC Scholarships -- Appendix B: Computing Officer Retention -- Appendix C: Tier IA Scholarship Analysis and Implementation -- Appendix D: Interview Protocols.

In the face of rising tuition costs and the increased importance of scholarships to meeting its commission mission, the Army designed a new scholarship program, known as the tiered scholarship program because it offered four different scholarship values (called tiers). Under the new program, enrollments at public colleges increased modestly and the Army controlled the total scholarship cost. But as feared, many fewer of the nation's most academically able students enrolled in ROTC, and the programs at the nation's most prestigious private colleges and universities were facing the prospect of closure. Based on these findings, the authors recommended and the Army implemented a high-value scholarship targeted to some prestigious private colleges. The study also analyzes several complete scholarship programs to replace the tiered scholarships. The analysis supports plans that continue to offer high-value scholarships at some prestigious private schools, while offering lower values at other schools. Although it would entail some significant tradeoffs, the authors have also presented a plan that would offer greater values to in-state students at public schools--a large potential market, especially if tuition increases in the private schools do not abate in the decade ahead. These offers would require congressional approval because the law currently prohibits the use of scholarships for room and board, which constitute the largest portion of these in-state students' expenses to attend college.

Mode of access: Internet.

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Allocating scholarships for Army ROTC by Goldman, Charles A., ©1999
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