Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)
Library,Documentation and Information Science Division

“A research journal serves that narrow

borderland which separates the known from the unknown”

-P.C.Mahalanobis


Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Sending your government a message [electronic resource] : e-mail communication between citizens and government / C. Richard Neu, Robert H. Anderson, Tora K. Bikson.

By: Neu, C. R. (Carl Richard), 1949-.
Contributor(s): Anderson, Robert H. (Robert Helms), 1939- | Bikson, Tora K, 1940-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Santa Monica, CA : RAND, 1999Description: 1 online resource (xxx, 200 p.) : ill.ISBN: 0585360642 (electronic bk.); 9780585360645 (electronic bk.); 9780833027542; 0833027549; 9780833043467 (electronic bk.); 0833043463 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Administrative agencies -- United States -- Communication systems | Executive departments -- United States -- Communication systems | Electronic mail systems -- United States | Minist�eres -- �Etats-Unis -- Communication, Syst�emes de | Courrier �electronique -- �Etats-Unis | �Etats-Unis -- Administration -- Communication, Syst�emes de | COMPUTERS -- System Administration -- Email Administration | Electronic booksGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sending your government a message.DDC classification: 384.3/4 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
The Medium and the Messages: Noteworthy Features Case Study: The Health Care Financing Administration and the Medicare Program Case Study: California's Employment Development Department and its Unemployment Insurance Program Security and Related Technical Issues Citizens, Computers, and Connectivity: A Review of Trends Conclusions, Observations, and Recommendations
Summary: In 1995, RAND published a book exploring the feasibility and societal implications of providing "universal" access to electronic mail within the United States (Robert H. Anderson et al., Universal Access to E-Mail: Feasibility and Societal Implications, MR-650-MF). Among the nine policy conclusions and recommendations in that report were these: It is critical that electronic mail be a basic service in a national information infrastructure; it is important to reduce the increasing gaps in access to basic electronic information services, specifically, access to electronic mail services; there are no fundamental technical barriers to providing universal access to electronic mail services. This book explores the possibility for expanded citizen-government personalized electronic communication. Of particular interest are interactions between government agencies and individual citizens--interactions involving personal information, iterated communications between an individual and a government agency, and the use of a personal electronic mailbox for the individual. It provides an informal survey of current state uses of such communication, supplemented by two case studies of potential use. It also uses 1997 Current Population Survey data to update the electronic access trends in the United States that were highlighted in the 1995 study.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references.

Chapter 2 The Medium and the Messages: Noteworthy Features 15 -- Chapter 3 Case Study: The Health Care Financing Administration and the Medicare Program 31 -- Chapter 4 Case Study: California's Employment Development Department and its Unemployment Insurance Program 59 -- Chapter 5 Security and Related Technical Issues 95 -- Chapter 6 Citizens, Computers, and Connectivity: A Review of Trends 119 -- Chapter 7 Conclusions, Observations, and Recommendations 149.

In 1995, RAND published a book exploring the feasibility and societal implications of providing "universal" access to electronic mail within the United States (Robert H. Anderson et al., Universal Access to E-Mail: Feasibility and Societal Implications, MR-650-MF). Among the nine policy conclusions and recommendations in that report were these: It is critical that electronic mail be a basic service in a national information infrastructure; it is important to reduce the increasing gaps in access to basic electronic information services, specifically, access to electronic mail services; there are no fundamental technical barriers to providing universal access to electronic mail services. This book explores the possibility for expanded citizen-government personalized electronic communication. Of particular interest are interactions between government agencies and individual citizens--interactions involving personal information, iterated communications between an individual and a government agency, and the use of a personal electronic mailbox for the individual. It provides an informal survey of current state uses of such communication, supplemented by two case studies of potential use. It also uses 1997 Current Population Survey data to update the electronic access trends in the United States that were highlighted in the 1995 study.

Description based on print version record.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Other editions of this work

Sending your government a message by Neu, C. R. ©1999
Sending your government a message by Neu, C. R. ©1999
Library, Documentation and Information Science Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B T Road, Kolkata 700108, INDIA
Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


Visitor Counter