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Othello and interpretive traditions [electronic resource] / Edward Pechter.

By: Pechter, Edward, 1941-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in theatre history and culture: Publisher: Iowa City : University of Iowa Press, c1999Description: 1 online resource (xii, 255 p.) : ill.ISBN: 1587292971 (electronic bk.); 9781587292972 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Othello | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Criticism and interpretation -- History | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Stage history | Muslims in literature | Blacks in literature | Tragedy | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Othello | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Critique et interpr�etation -- Histoire | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Histoire sc�enique | Musulmans dans la litt�erature | Noirs dans la litt�erature | Trag�edie | LITERARY CRITICISM -- Shakespeare | DRAMA -- Shakespeare | Electronic booksGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Othello and interpretive traditions.DDC classification: 822.3/3 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Preface; Introduction: Othello and Interpretive Traditions; Chapter 1: Othello in Theatrical and Critical History; Chapter 2: Disconfirmation; Chapter 3: lago; Chapter 4: The Fall of Othello; Chapter 5: The "Pity" Act; Chapter 6: Death without Transfiguration; Afterword: Interpretation as Contamination; Appendix: "Character Endures"; Notes; Works Cited; Index;
Summary: ��During the past twenty years or so, Othello has become the Shakespearean tragedy that speaks most powerfully to our contemporary concerns. Focusing on race and gender (and on class, ethnicity, sexuality, and nationality), the play talks about what audiences want to talk about. Yet at the same time, as refracted through Iago, it forces us to hear what we do not want to hear; like the characters in the play, we become trapped in our own prejudicial malice and guilt.��
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [231]-246) and index.

Description based on print version record.

Preface; Introduction: Othello and Interpretive Traditions; Chapter 1: Othello in Theatrical and Critical History; Chapter 2: Disconfirmation; Chapter 3: lago; Chapter 4: The Fall of Othello; Chapter 5: The "Pity" Act; Chapter 6: Death without Transfiguration; Afterword: Interpretation as Contamination; Appendix: "Character Endures"; Notes; Works Cited; Index;

��During the past twenty years or so, Othello has become the Shakespearean tragedy that speaks most powerfully to our contemporary concerns. Focusing on race and gender (and on class, ethnicity, sexuality, and nationality), the play talks about what audiences want to talk about. Yet at the same time, as refracted through Iago, it forces us to hear what we do not want to hear; like the characters in the play, we become trapped in our own prejudicial malice and guilt.��

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