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How the war was won [electronic resource] : command and technology in the British Army on the western front, 1917-1918 / Tim Travers.

By: Travers, Timothy.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: London ; New York : Routledge, 1992Description: 1 online resource (xviii, 232 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 0203310713 (electronic bk.); 9780203310717 (electronic bk.); 0203725654 (electronic bk. : Adobe Reader); 9780203725658 (electronic bk. : Adobe Reader); 9780203417416; 0203417410; 9780415076289; 0415076285.Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Technology | Great Britain. Army. British Expeditionary Force -- History -- World War, 1914-1918 | Great Britain. Army. British Expeditionary Force | Grande-bretagne. Army -- Histoire -- Guerre, 1914-1918 (Mondiale, 1re) | Guerre, 1914-1918 (Mondiale, 1re) -- Campagnes et batailles -- Front occidental | Art et science militaires -- Grande Bretagne -- Histoire -- 20e si�ecle | HISTORY -- Military -- World War I | Electronic books | World War 1 Army operations | France | BelgiumGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: How the war was won.DDC classification: 940.4/21 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Book Cover; Title; Contents; List of plates; List of maps; Acknowledgements; List of abbreviations; Introduction; Prologue: Images of war; PARALYSIS OF COMMAND: FROM PASSCHENDAELE TO CAMBRAI; A COMMAND DIVIDED: GHQ AND THE DEBATE OVER TRADITIONAL VERSUS MECHANICAL WARFARE IN EARLY 1918; CRISIS IN COMMAND: THE GERMAN SPRING OFFENSIVES AND THE USES OF TECHNOLOGY; : The Lys and the Aisne, April to June 1918; COMMAND AND TECHNOLOGY IN ALLIANCE: FROM HAMEL TO AMIENS, JULY TO AUGUST 1918; COMMAND VERSUS TECHNOLOGY: THE WAR OF MOVEMENT, SEPTEMBER TO NOVEMBER 1918; CONCLUSION; Appendix
Summary: This important and sometimes controversial book explains what part the British Expeditionary Force played in bringing the First World War to an end. Tim Travers shows in detail how an Allied victory was achieved. He focuses on the British Army on the Western Front in relation to the themes of command and technology, drawing on a wide range of sources from archives in three countries. The book provides new arguments about the origins of mechanical warfare, the role of Douglas Haig, and the near-collapse of the German army by July 1918. Tim Travers argues that, despite poor leadership, the British army ultimately wore its opponent down by using increasing amounts of technology. Complex and detailed information is presented in a clear and readable form. An introductory paragraph at the beginning of each chapter, combined with numerous maps and photos, also makes the book particularly useful for students.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 220-225) and index.

Description based on print version record.

Book Cover; Title; Contents; List of plates; List of maps; Acknowledgements; List of abbreviations; Introduction; Prologue: Images of war; PARALYSIS OF COMMAND: FROM PASSCHENDAELE TO CAMBRAI; A COMMAND DIVIDED: GHQ AND THE DEBATE OVER TRADITIONAL VERSUS MECHANICAL WARFARE IN EARLY 1918; CRISIS IN COMMAND: THE GERMAN SPRING OFFENSIVES AND THE USES OF TECHNOLOGY; : The Lys and the Aisne, April to June 1918; COMMAND AND TECHNOLOGY IN ALLIANCE: FROM HAMEL TO AMIENS, JULY TO AUGUST 1918; COMMAND VERSUS TECHNOLOGY: THE WAR OF MOVEMENT, SEPTEMBER TO NOVEMBER 1918; CONCLUSION; Appendix

This important and sometimes controversial book explains what part the British Expeditionary Force played in bringing the First World War to an end. Tim Travers shows in detail how an Allied victory was achieved. He focuses on the British Army on the Western Front in relation to the themes of command and technology, drawing on a wide range of sources from archives in three countries. The book provides new arguments about the origins of mechanical warfare, the role of Douglas Haig, and the near-collapse of the German army by July 1918. Tim Travers argues that, despite poor leadership, the British army ultimately wore its opponent down by using increasing amounts of technology. Complex and detailed information is presented in a clear and readable form. An introductory paragraph at the beginning of each chapter, combined with numerous maps and photos, also makes the book particularly useful for students.

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Other editions of this work

How the war was won by Travers, Timothy. ©1992
How the war was won by Travers, Timothy. ©1992
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Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


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