Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)
Library,Documentation and Information Science Division

“A research journal serves that narrow

borderland which separates the known from the unknown”

-P.C.Mahalanobis


Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Stealth democracy [electronic resource] : Americans' beliefs about how government should work / John R. Hibbing, Elizabeth Theiss-Morse.

By: Hibbing, John R.
Contributor(s): Theiss-Morse, Elizabeth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Cambridge studies in political psychology and public opinion: Publisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 284 p.) : ill.ISBN: 0511020473 (electronic bk.); 9780511020476 (electronic bk.); 0521811384 (hardback); 9780521811385 (hardback); 0521009863 (pbk.); 9780521009867 (pbk.); 9780511613722 (electronic bk.); 0511613725 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Political participation -- United States -- Public opinion | Democracy -- United States -- Public opinion | Public opinion -- United States | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Freedom & Security -- Civil Rights | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Freedom & Security -- Human Rights | Electronic books | Politieke participatie | Inspraak | Publieke opinie | Participation politique -- �Etats-Unis -- Opinion publique | D�emocratie -- �Etats-Unis -- Opinion publique | Opinion publique -- �Etats-Unis | Politische Einstellung | Demokratie | USA | Participation politique -- �Etats-Unis -- Opinion publique | D�emocratie -- �Etats-Unis -- Opinion publique | Opinion publique -- Etats-Unis -- 1970-2000Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Stealth democracy.DDC classification: 323/.042/0973 Other classification: 89.57 | MC 6700 | ME 3000 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
pt. 1. The benefits of studying the processes people want -- Policy space and American politics -- Process space: an introduction -- Using process space to explain features of American politics -- pt. 2. The processes people want -- Attitudes toward specific processes -- Public assessments of people and politicians -- Americans' desire for stealth democracy -- pt. 3. Should people be given the processes they want? -- Popular deliberation and group involvement in theory -- The realities of popular deliberation and group involvement -- Improving government and people's attitudes toward it.
Review: "Americans often complain about the current operation of their government, but scholars have never developed a complete picture of people's preferred type of government. In this provocative and timely book, John Hibbing and Elizabeth Theiss-Morse, employing an original national survey and focus groups, report the specific governmental procedures Americans desire. Their results are surprising. Contrary to the prevailing view that people want greater involvement in politics, most citizens do not care about most policies and therefore are content to turn over decision-making authority to someone else.Summary: People's most intense desire for the political system is that decision makers be empathetic and, especially, non-self-interested, not that they be responsive and accountable to the people's largely nonexistent policy preferences or, even worse, that the people be obligated to participate directly in decision making. In light of these findings, Hibbing and Theiss-Morse conclude by cautioning communitarians, direct democrats, social capitalists, deliberation theorists, and all those who think that greater citizen involvement is the solution to society's problems."--BOOK JACKET.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-274) and index.

Description based on print version record.

pt. 1. The benefits of studying the processes people want -- Policy space and American politics -- Process space: an introduction -- Using process space to explain features of American politics -- pt. 2. The processes people want -- Attitudes toward specific processes -- Public assessments of people and politicians -- Americans' desire for stealth democracy -- pt. 3. Should people be given the processes they want? -- Popular deliberation and group involvement in theory -- The realities of popular deliberation and group involvement -- Improving government and people's attitudes toward it.

"Americans often complain about the current operation of their government, but scholars have never developed a complete picture of people's preferred type of government. In this provocative and timely book, John Hibbing and Elizabeth Theiss-Morse, employing an original national survey and focus groups, report the specific governmental procedures Americans desire. Their results are surprising. Contrary to the prevailing view that people want greater involvement in politics, most citizens do not care about most policies and therefore are content to turn over decision-making authority to someone else.

People's most intense desire for the political system is that decision makers be empathetic and, especially, non-self-interested, not that they be responsive and accountable to the people's largely nonexistent policy preferences or, even worse, that the people be obligated to participate directly in decision making. In light of these findings, Hibbing and Theiss-Morse conclude by cautioning communitarians, direct democrats, social capitalists, deliberation theorists, and all those who think that greater citizen involvement is the solution to society's problems."--BOOK JACKET.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Other editions of this work

Stealth democracy by Hibbing, John R. ©2002
Stealth democracy by Hibbing, John R. ©2002
Stealth democracy by Hibbing, John R. ©2002
Library, Documentation and Information Science Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B T Road, Kolkata 700108, INDIA
Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


Visitor Counter