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Mestizo democracy [electronic resource] : the politics of crossing borders / by John Francis Burke ; foreword by Virgilio Elizondo.

By: Burke, John Francis, 1957-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Rio Grande/R�io Bravo: no. 8.Publisher: College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c2002Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (xv, 304 p.).ISBN: 1585449784 (electronic bk.); 9781585449781 (electronic bk.); 9781603446426 (electronic bk.); 1603446427 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Multiculturalism -- United States | Democracy -- United States | Americanization | Political culture -- United States | United States -- Emigration and immigration | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Anthropology -- Cultural | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Discrimination & Race Relations | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Minority Studies | Multiculturalisme -- �Etats-Unis | Am�ericanisation | Culture politique -- �Etats-Unis | Multikulturelle Gesellschaft | Demokratie | Politik | USA | Multiculturalismo Estados Unidos | Democracia Estados Unidos | Americanizaci�on | Cultura pol�itica Estados UnidosGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Mestizo democracy.DDC classification: 305.8/00973/090511 Online resources: EBSCOhost | EBSCOhost
Contents:
Moving beyond the either/or of Unum v. Pluribus -- Mestizaje as holistic engagement of multiple cultures -- Attributes of a Mestizo democracy -- A post-liberation philosophy and theology -- Reconciling multiculturalism with democracy -- Fostering unity-in-diversity -- Crossing borders as public policy.
Summary: Annotation It can come as no surprise that the ethnic makeup of the American population is rapidly changing. In this volume, John Francis Burke offers a "mestizo" theory of democracy and traces its implications for public policy. Mestizo, meaning "mixture, " is a term from the Mexican socio-political experience. It represents a blend of indigenous, African, and Spanish genes and cultures in Latin America. This mixture is not a "melting pot" experience; rather, the influences of the different cultures remain identifiable but influence each other in dynamic ways. Burke analyzes democratic theory and multiculturalism to develop a model for cultivating a community that can deal effectively with its cultural diversity. He applies this model to official language(s), voting and participation, equal employment opportunity, housing, and free trade. Burke concludes that in the United States we are becoming mestizo whether we know it or not and whether we like it or not. By embracing this, we can forge a future together that will be greater than the sum of its parts.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-293) and index.

Moving beyond the either/or of Unum v. Pluribus -- Mestizaje as holistic engagement of multiple cultures -- Attributes of a Mestizo democracy -- A post-liberation philosophy and theology -- Reconciling multiculturalism with democracy -- Fostering unity-in-diversity -- Crossing borders as public policy.

Annotation It can come as no surprise that the ethnic makeup of the American population is rapidly changing. In this volume, John Francis Burke offers a "mestizo" theory of democracy and traces its implications for public policy. Mestizo, meaning "mixture, " is a term from the Mexican socio-political experience. It represents a blend of indigenous, African, and Spanish genes and cultures in Latin America. This mixture is not a "melting pot" experience; rather, the influences of the different cultures remain identifiable but influence each other in dynamic ways. Burke analyzes democratic theory and multiculturalism to develop a model for cultivating a community that can deal effectively with its cultural diversity. He applies this model to official language(s), voting and participation, equal employment opportunity, housing, and free trade. Burke concludes that in the United States we are becoming mestizo whether we know it or not and whether we like it or not. By embracing this, we can forge a future together that will be greater than the sum of its parts.

Description based on print version record.

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Other editions of this work

Mestizo democracy by Burke, John Francis, ©2002
Mestizo democracy by Burke, John Francis, ©2002
Mestizo democracy by Burke, John Francis, ©2002
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