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Politics after television [electronic resource] : religious nationalism and the reshaping of the Indian public / Arvind Rajagopal.

By: Rajagopal, Arvind.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2001Description: 1 online resource (viii, 393 p.).ISBN: 0511040261 (electronic bk.); 9780511040269 (electronic bk.); 0511155956; 9780511155956; 9780521640534 (hbk.); 0521640539 (hbk.); 9780511489051 (electronic bk.); 0511489056 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Television in politics -- India | Elections -- India | Mass media -- Political aspects -- India | Nationalism -- India -- Religious aspects | Immigrants -- United States | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Anthropology -- Cultural | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Public Policy -- Cultural Policy | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Popular Culture | Electronic books | Televisie | Politieke aspecten | Religieuze aspecten | Hindoes | Bharatiya Janata Party | Fernsehen | Hinduismus | Nationalsozialismus | �Offentlichkeit | Indien | T�el�evision et politique -- �Etats-Unis | T�el�evision et politique -- Inde | Nationalisme -- Sociologie -- IndeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Politics after television.DDC classification: 306.2/0954 Other classification: 05.36 | MH 14330 | MH 14338 | MS 4700 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Hindu nationalism and the cultural forms of Indian politics -- Prime time religion -- The communicating thing and its public -- A "split public" in the making and unmaking of the Ram Janmabhumi movement -- Organization, performance, and symbol -- Hindutva goes global -- Conclusion: How has television changed the context of politics in India? -- Background to the Babri Masjid dispute.
Summary: In January 1987, the Indian state-run television began broadcasting a Hindu epic in serial form, the Ramayan, to nationwide audiences, violating a decades-old taboo on religious partisanship. What resulted was the largest political campaign in post-independence times, around the symbol of Lord Ram, led by Hindu nationalists. The complexion of Indian politics was irrevocably changed thereafter. In this book, Arvind Rajagopal analyses this extraordinary series of events. While audiences may have thought they were harking back to an epic golden age, Hindu nationalist leaders were embracing the prospects of neo-liberalism and globalization. Television was the device that hinged these movements together, symbolizing the new possibilities of politics, at once more inclusive and authoritarian. Simultaneously, this study examines how the larger historical context was woven into and changed the character of Hindu nationalism.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 372-389) and index.

Description based on print version record.

1. Hindu nationalism and the cultural forms of Indian politics -- 2. Prime time religion -- 3. The communicating thing and its public -- 4. A "split public" in the making and unmaking of the Ram Janmabhumi movement -- 5. Organization, performance, and symbol -- 6. Hindutva goes global -- Conclusion: How has television changed the context of politics in India? -- App. Background to the Babri Masjid dispute.

In January 1987, the Indian state-run television began broadcasting a Hindu epic in serial form, the Ramayan, to nationwide audiences, violating a decades-old taboo on religious partisanship. What resulted was the largest political campaign in post-independence times, around the symbol of Lord Ram, led by Hindu nationalists. The complexion of Indian politics was irrevocably changed thereafter. In this book, Arvind Rajagopal analyses this extraordinary series of events. While audiences may have thought they were harking back to an epic golden age, Hindu nationalist leaders were embracing the prospects of neo-liberalism and globalization. Television was the device that hinged these movements together, symbolizing the new possibilities of politics, at once more inclusive and authoritarian. Simultaneously, this study examines how the larger historical context was woven into and changed the character of Hindu nationalism.

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Other editions of this work

Politics after television by Rajagopal Arvind
Politics after television by Rajagopal, Arvind. ©2001
Politics after television by Rajagopal, Arvind. ©2001
Politics after television by Rajagopal, Arvind. ©2001
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