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Religious conviction in liberal politics [electronic resource] / Christopher J. Eberle.

By: Eberle, Christopher J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002Description: 1 online resource (x, 405 p.).ISBN: 0511042280 (electronic bk.); 9780511042287 (electronic bk.); 9780511613562 (electronic bk.); 0511613563 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Religion and politics | Liberalism -- Religious aspects | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Process -- Political Advocacy | Liberalisme | Geloof | Religion et politique | Lib�eralisme -- Aspect religieux | Liberalismus | Religion | Religi�on y pol�itica | Liberalismo Aspectos religiososGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Religious conviction in liberal politics.DDC classification: 322/.1 Other classification: 89.12 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Religion and responsible citizenship --Pluralism and religion -- Justificatory liberalism -- What respect requires -- What respect does not require -- Religion, war, and division -- Populist conceptions of public justification -- Liberalism and mysticism -- A theistic case for restraint.
Review: "Is it possible for a deeply religious person to be a good citizen in a liberal democracy? There is room for doubt regarding many religious believers. Why? Many religious people take themselves to be conscience bound to support coercive laws for which they have only religious reasons. But many political theorists claim that such exclusive reliance on religious reasons violates the norms of good citizenship and does so for any of a number of reasons: It grinds to a halt productive conversation on the laws to which we are subject: it injects gratuitously divisive factors in already overheated discussions; it fails to respect the autonomy and personhood of citizens who find religious reasons implausible.".Summary: "Against this position regarding the proper role of religious convictions in liberal politics, Christopher Eberle argues that citizens can discharge every expectation we reasonably have of them, even if they have only a religious rationale for a favored coercive law. In making his case, Eberle articulates an ideal of citizenship that permits citizens to engage in politics without privatizing their religious commitments and yet does not license a mindless and intransigent sectarianism.".Summary: "A controversial book that offers a substantial challenge to political liberalism, this work will be read with particular interest by students and professionals in philosophy, political science, law, and religious studies, as well as by general readers who seek insight into the relationship between religious commitments and liberal politics."--BOOK JACKET.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Description based on print version record.

Religion and responsible citizenship --Pluralism and religion -- Justificatory liberalism -- What respect requires -- What respect does not require -- Religion, war, and division -- Populist conceptions of public justification -- Liberalism and mysticism -- A theistic case for restraint.

"Is it possible for a deeply religious person to be a good citizen in a liberal democracy? There is room for doubt regarding many religious believers. Why? Many religious people take themselves to be conscience bound to support coercive laws for which they have only religious reasons. But many political theorists claim that such exclusive reliance on religious reasons violates the norms of good citizenship and does so for any of a number of reasons: It grinds to a halt productive conversation on the laws to which we are subject: it injects gratuitously divisive factors in already overheated discussions; it fails to respect the autonomy and personhood of citizens who find religious reasons implausible.".

"Against this position regarding the proper role of religious convictions in liberal politics, Christopher Eberle argues that citizens can discharge every expectation we reasonably have of them, even if they have only a religious rationale for a favored coercive law. In making his case, Eberle articulates an ideal of citizenship that permits citizens to engage in politics without privatizing their religious commitments and yet does not license a mindless and intransigent sectarianism.".

"A controversial book that offers a substantial challenge to political liberalism, this work will be read with particular interest by students and professionals in philosophy, political science, law, and religious studies, as well as by general readers who seek insight into the relationship between religious commitments and liberal politics."--BOOK JACKET.

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Other editions of this work

Religious conviction in liberal politics by Eberle, Christopher J. ©2002
Religious conviction in liberal politics by Eberle, Christopher J. ©2002
Religious conviction in liberal politics by Eberle, Christopher J. ©2002
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