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Beyond the immigrant enclave [electronic resource] : network change and assimilation / Susan Wierzbicki.

By: Wierzbicki, Susan K.
Material type: TextTextSeries: New Americans (LFB Scholarly Publishing LLC): Publisher: New York : LFB Scholarly Pub., 2004Description: 1 online resource (ix, 166 p.).ISBN: 1593321228 (electronic bk.); 9781593321222 (electronic bk.); 9781593320041 (alk. paper); 1593320043 (alk. paper); 1280361417; 9781280361418.Subject(s): Minorities -- United States -- Social conditions | Immigrants -- United States -- Social conditions | Social networks -- United States | Acculturation -- United States | Assimilation (Sociology) | Community life -- United States | United States -- Ethnic relations | United States -- Social conditions -- 1980- | Electronic books | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Discrimination & Race Relations | Einwanderung | Soziale Situation | Akkulturation | Rassenbeziehung | USA | Samfundsvidenskab SociologiGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Beyond the immigrant enclave.DDC classification: 305.9/06912/0973 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Immigrant networks -- Community as networks and place -- The presence of strong ties -- Kinship ties -- Ties among neighbors -- Similarity of neighborhood ties -- The community typology and immigrants.
Summary: Immigrant communities - even poor ones - are often portrayed as solidary and supportive. Wierzbicki examines the presence and homogeneity of ties among the foreign- and native-born of different ethnic groups. She finds that the foreign-born consistently report fewer ties than the native-born, in part because of less education or shorter duration of residence.The foreign-born also have more ethnically homogeneous ties, even when they live outside enclaves and in wealthier areas. This finding has implications for theories of assimilation or incorporation. For lack of network data, previous examination of assimilation has often relied on patterns of residential settlement rather than actual social ties. This study indicates that the foreign-born may assimilate spatially but not socially.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 137-160) and index.

Immigrant networks -- Community as networks and place -- The presence of strong ties -- Kinship ties -- Ties among neighbors -- Similarity of neighborhood ties -- The community typology and immigrants.

Description based on print version record.

Immigrant communities - even poor ones - are often portrayed as solidary and supportive. Wierzbicki examines the presence and homogeneity of ties among the foreign- and native-born of different ethnic groups. She finds that the foreign-born consistently report fewer ties than the native-born, in part because of less education or shorter duration of residence.The foreign-born also have more ethnically homogeneous ties, even when they live outside enclaves and in wealthier areas. This finding has implications for theories of assimilation or incorporation. For lack of network data, previous examination of assimilation has often relied on patterns of residential settlement rather than actual social ties. This study indicates that the foreign-born may assimilate spatially but not socially.

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Other editions of this work

Beyond the immigrant enclave by Wierzbicki, Susan K. ©2004
Beyond the immigrant enclave by Wierzbicki, Susan K. ©2004
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