Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)
Library,Documentation and Information Science Division

“A research journal serves that narrow

borderland which separates the known from the unknown”

-P.C.Mahalanobis


Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Children, cinema and censorship [electronic resource] : from Dracula to the Dead End Kids / Sarah J. Smith.

By: Smith, Sarah, 1947-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Cinema and society: Publisher: London ; New York : I.B. Tauris, 2005Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 237 p.) : ill.ISBN: 1423729005 (electronic bk.); 9781423729006 (electronic bk.); 1850438129 (hbk.); 9781850438120 (hbk.); 1850438137 (pbk.); 9781850438137 (pbk.).Subject(s): Motion pictures and children | Motion pictures -- Censorship | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Media Studies | Electronic books | Cin�ema et enfants -- Grande-Bretagne | Cin�ema -- Censure -- Grande-Bretagne | Cin�ema et enfants | Cin�ema -- Censure | Films | Kinderen | Censuur | Regelgeving | Filmzensur | Film | Kindgerechtigkeit | Gro�britannien | USAGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Children, cinema and censorship.DDC classification: 302.2343083 Other classification: 05.37 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
The doom of a generation? -- How Bridget served the salad undressed: the regulation of cinema 1895-1929 -- It ain't no sin: the regulation of cinema 1929-1939 -- Moral panic or flapdoodle? -- Children as censors -- Matinees, clubs and children's cinema culture -- Children and cinema: control and resistance -- Appendix I: T.P. O'Connor's 43 rules of the BBFC -- Appendix II: BBFC codified grounds for censorship, 1926 -- Appendix III: List of 'don'ts and be carefuls', adopted by California Association for guidance of producers, 8 June 1927 -- Appendix IV: Films classified as 'horrific' or certified "H" by the BBFC, 1933-40 -- Appendix V: Members of the Edinburgh Cinema Enquiry Committee.
Summary: "Using original research, this book explores the recurring debates in Britain and America about children and how they use and respond to the media, focusing on a key example: the controversy surrounding children and cinema in the 1930s. It explores the attempts to control children's viewing, the theories that supported these approaches and the extent to which they were successful. The author develops her challenging proposition that children are agents in their cinema viewing, not victims; showing how these angels with dirty faces colonized the cinema. She reveals their distinct cinema culture and the ways in which they subverted or circumvented official censorship including the Hays Code and the British Board of Film Censors, to regulate their own viewing of a variety of films, including Frankenstein, King Kong and The Cat and the Canary"--Provided by publisher.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-229) and index.

Description based on print version record.

The doom of a generation? -- How Bridget served the salad undressed: the regulation of cinema 1895-1929 -- It ain't no sin: the regulation of cinema 1929-1939 -- Moral panic or flapdoodle? -- Children as censors -- Matinees, clubs and children's cinema culture -- Children and cinema: control and resistance -- Appendix I: T.P. O'Connor's 43 rules of the BBFC -- Appendix II: BBFC codified grounds for censorship, 1926 -- Appendix III: List of 'don'ts and be carefuls', adopted by California Association for guidance of producers, 8 June 1927 -- Appendix IV: Films classified as 'horrific' or certified "H" by the BBFC, 1933-40 -- Appendix V: Members of the Edinburgh Cinema Enquiry Committee.

"Using original research, this book explores the recurring debates in Britain and America about children and how they use and respond to the media, focusing on a key example: the controversy surrounding children and cinema in the 1930s. It explores the attempts to control children's viewing, the theories that supported these approaches and the extent to which they were successful. The author develops her challenging proposition that children are agents in their cinema viewing, not victims; showing how these angels with dirty faces colonized the cinema. She reveals their distinct cinema culture and the ways in which they subverted or circumvented official censorship including the Hays Code and the British Board of Film Censors, to regulate their own viewing of a variety of films, including Frankenstein, King Kong and The Cat and the Canary"--Provided by publisher.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Other editions of this work

Children, cinema and censorship by Smith, Sarah, ©2005
Children, cinema and censorship by Smith, Sarah, ©2005
Library, Documentation and Information Science Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B T Road, Kolkata 700108, INDIA
Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


Visitor Counter