Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)
Library,Documentation and Information Science Division

“A research journal serves that narrow

borderland which separates the known from the unknown”

-P.C.Mahalanobis


Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Armies of the young [electronic resource] : child soldiers in war and terrorism / David M. Rosen.

By: Rosen, David M, 1944-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Rutgers series in childhood studies: Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2005Description: 1 online resource (xi, 199 p.).ISBN: 0813537835 (electronic bk.); 9780813537832 (electronic bk.); 9780813535678 (hardcover : alk. paper); 0813535670 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780813535685 (pbk. : alk. paper); 0813535689 (pbk. : alk. paper); 1280360941; 9781280360947.Subject(s): Child soldiers | World politics -- 20th century | World politics -- 1989- | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING -- Military Science | HISTORY -- Military -- Other | Electronic books | Enfants soldats | Politique mondiale -- 20e si�ecle | Politique mondiale -- 1989- | Kind | Soldat | Samfundsvidenskab PolitologiGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Armies of the young.DDC classification: 355/.0083 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
War and childhood -- Fighting for their lives: Jewish child soldiers of World War II -- Fighting for diamonds: the child soldiers of Sierra Leone -- Fighting for the apocalypse: Palestinian child soldiers -- The politics of age.
Summary: Children have served as soldiers throughout history. They fought in the American Revolution, the Civil War, and in both world wars. They served as uniformed soldiers, camouflaged insurgents, and even suicide bombers. Indeed, the first U.S. soldier to be killed by hostile fire in the Afghanistan war was shot in ambush by a fourteen-year-old boy. Does this mean that child soldiers are aggressors? Or are they victims? It is a difficult question with no obvious answer, yet in recent years the acceptable answer among humanitarian organizations and contemporary scholars has been resoundingly the latter. These children are most often seen as especially hideous examples of adult criminal exploitation. In this provocative book, David M. Rosen argues that this response vastly oversimplifies the child soldier problem. Drawing on three dramatic examples-from Sierra Leone, Palestine, and Eastern Europe during the Holocaust-Rosen vividly illustrates this controversial view. In each case, he shows that children are not always passive victims, but often make the rational decision that not fighting is worse than fighting. With a critical eye to international law, Armies of the Young urges readers to reconsider the situation of child combatants in light of circumstance and history before adopting uninformed child protectionist views. In the process, Rosen paints a memorable and unsettling picture of the role of children in international conflicts.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-191) and index.

War and childhood -- Fighting for their lives: Jewish child soldiers of World War II -- Fighting for diamonds: the child soldiers of Sierra Leone -- Fighting for the apocalypse: Palestinian child soldiers -- The politics of age.

Description based on print version record.

Children have served as soldiers throughout history. They fought in the American Revolution, the Civil War, and in both world wars. They served as uniformed soldiers, camouflaged insurgents, and even suicide bombers. Indeed, the first U.S. soldier to be killed by hostile fire in the Afghanistan war was shot in ambush by a fourteen-year-old boy. Does this mean that child soldiers are aggressors? Or are they victims? It is a difficult question with no obvious answer, yet in recent years the acceptable answer among humanitarian organizations and contemporary scholars has been resoundingly the latter. These children are most often seen as especially hideous examples of adult criminal exploitation. In this provocative book, David M. Rosen argues that this response vastly oversimplifies the child soldier problem. Drawing on three dramatic examples-from Sierra Leone, Palestine, and Eastern Europe during the Holocaust-Rosen vividly illustrates this controversial view. In each case, he shows that children are not always passive victims, but often make the rational decision that not fighting is worse than fighting. With a critical eye to international law, Armies of the Young urges readers to reconsider the situation of child combatants in light of circumstance and history before adopting uninformed child protectionist views. In the process, Rosen paints a memorable and unsettling picture of the role of children in international conflicts.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Other editions of this work

Armies of the young by Rosen, David M., ©2005
Armies of the young by Rosen, David M., ©2005
Armies of the young by Rosen, David M., ©2005
Library, Documentation and Information Science Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B T Road, Kolkata 700108, INDIA
Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


Visitor Counter