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Frequency and the emergence of linguistic structure [electronic resource] / edited by Joan Bybee, Paul Hopper.

Contributor(s): Bybee, Joan L | Hopper, Paul J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Typological studies in language: v. 45.Publisher: Amsterdam ; [Great Britain] : J. Benjamins, c2001Description: 1 online resource (vi, 492 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9789027298034 (electronic bk.); 9027298033 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Frequency (Linguistics) | Grammar, Comparative and general | Fr�equence des mots | Grammaire compar�ee et g�en�erale | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES -- Grammar & Punctuation | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES -- Linguistics -- Syntax | Frequentie | Taalstructuur | Taalverandering | Grammaticalisering | Gram�atica comparadaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Frequency and the emergence of linguistic structure.DDC classification: 415 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
FREQUENCY AND THE EMERGENCE OF LINGUISTIC STRUCTURE; Editorial page; Title page; LCC page; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction to frequency and the emergence of linguistic structure; Part I: Patterns of Use; Transitivity, clause structure, and argument structure: Evidence from conversation; Local patterns of subjectivity in person and verb type in American English conversation; Paths to prepositions? A corpus-based study of the acquisition of a lexico-grammatical category; Part II: Word-level frequency effects; Lexical diffusion, lexical frequency, and lexical analysis.
Summary: A mainstay of functional linguistics has been the claim that linguistic elements and patterns that are frequently used in discourse become conventionalized as grammar. This book addresses the two issues that are basic to this claim: first, the question of what types of elements are frequently used in discourse and second, the question of how frequency of use affects cognitive representations. Reporting on evidence from natural conversation, diachronic change, variability, child language acquisition and psycholinguistic experimentation the original articles in this book support two major princi.
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Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

FREQUENCY AND THE EMERGENCE OF LINGUISTIC STRUCTURE; Editorial page; Title page; LCC page; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction to frequency and the emergence of linguistic structure; Part I: Patterns of Use; Transitivity, clause structure, and argument structure: Evidence from conversation; Local patterns of subjectivity in person and verb type in American English conversation; Paths to prepositions? A corpus-based study of the acquisition of a lexico-grammatical category; Part II: Word-level frequency effects; Lexical diffusion, lexical frequency, and lexical analysis.

A mainstay of functional linguistics has been the claim that linguistic elements and patterns that are frequently used in discourse become conventionalized as grammar. This book addresses the two issues that are basic to this claim: first, the question of what types of elements are frequently used in discourse and second, the question of how frequency of use affects cognitive representations. Reporting on evidence from natural conversation, diachronic change, variability, child language acquisition and psycholinguistic experimentation the original articles in this book support two major princi.

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