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Coastal resource management in the wider Caribbean [electronic resource] : resilience, adaptation, and community diversity / edited by Yvan Breton.

Contributor(s): Breton, Yvan.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Kingston [Jamaica] : Ottawa [Ont.] : Ian Randle Publishers ; International Development Research Centre, 2006Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 265 p.) : ill., maps, charts.ISBN: 9766372624 (pbk.); 9789766372620 (pbk.); 1552502236; 9781552502235; 1280718234; 9781280718236.Subject(s): Coastal zone management -- Caribbean Area | Coastal zone management -- Citizen participation | Coastal zone management -- Economic aspects | Littoral -- Am�enagement -- Cara�ibes (R�egion) | Littoral -- Am�enagement -- Participation des citoyens | Littoral -- Am�enagement -- Aspect �economique | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Real Estate -- GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Coastal resource management in the wider Caribbean.DDC classification: 333.91/716 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Cover -- Table of Contents -- Foreword -- Preface -- List of Tables and Figures -- Abbreviations -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 Social Sciences and the Diversity of Caribbean Communities -- Chapter 2 Interdisciplinary Research and Collaborative Management in Small Coastal Communitites -- Chapter 3 Territoriality44; Technical Revitalisation44; and Symbolism in Indigenous Communities -- Chapter 4 Communities and Stakeholders in Marine Protected Areas in the Caribbean -- Chapter 5 Community Mobilisation and Education in Contaminated Coastal Ecosystems -- Chapter 6 Seaweed and Mangroves58; Improving Environmental Practices in Coastal Communities to Secure Sustainable Livelihoods -- Chapter 7 Political Organisation and Socioeconomics of Fishing Communities of Trinidad and Tobago44; Belize44; and Grenada -- Chapter 8 Analytical Insights44; Lessons Learnt44; and Recommendations -- Contributors -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y -- Last Page.
Summary: "This volume deals with community-based coastal resource management (CBCRM) in the insular and continental Caribbean. Supported by a small-grant programme from the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and undertaken in collaboration with the International Ocean Institute (IOI) in Costa Rica and the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) in Belize, it summarises the results of a second phase that took place between January 2002 and February 2005. This programme was composed of 15 projects in 11 countries, with research teams coming from university research centres and various non-governmental organisations (NGOs). It was designed to better understand the heterogeneity of the Caribbean communities by taking a critical look at existing natural resource management (NRM) approaches in which, in our view, insufficient attention has been paid to the diversity of social institutions and ecosystems working at various scales in the management processes. During Phase I, results of the project were summarised in individual case studies. In Phase II, more structured exchanges produced collective writing efforts, which gave the study a stronger comparative and analytical orientation. In addition to chapters dealing with analytical and methodological issues in coastal management, the essence of the volume lies in five comparative and synthesised case studies that focus on particular management problems in diverse social contexts. Although this text is written primarily for a research audience, it should be of interest to coastal planners, decision makers, and funding agency representatives because this type of thinking needs to be shared far more widely among these groups in the Caribbean. For instance, we argue that particular attention should be given to reaching a better balance between natural and social sciences in the management of natural resources. We also need to deepen our understanding of local human contexts as part of the increasing tendency to decentralisation in many areas of the world. We hope that participants, individuals, and institutions have learned several lessons from this experience and that the programme will remain a valid, illustrative basis for further involvement in Caribbean coastal management issues. The preparation of this book was funded by the IDRC. The editors and authors would like to thank Dr Alejandro Guti�errez, Director del International Oceans Institute in Costa Rica, and Hugh Saul, Director of the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism in Belize, for their dedicated administrative support of this CBCRM programme in the Caribbean. We are also grateful to Manon Ruel and Sandra Baron, graduate students in anthropology at the Universit�e Laval, Qu�ebec, Canada, for regularly submitting documentation to the projects and participating in finalising this publication."--Pref.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Cover -- Table of Contents -- Foreword -- Preface -- List of Tables and Figures -- Abbreviations -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 Social Sciences and the Diversity of Caribbean Communities -- Chapter 2 Interdisciplinary Research and Collaborative Management in Small Coastal Communitites -- Chapter 3 Territoriality44; Technical Revitalisation44; and Symbolism in Indigenous Communities -- Chapter 4 Communities and Stakeholders in Marine Protected Areas in the Caribbean -- Chapter 5 Community Mobilisation and Education in Contaminated Coastal Ecosystems -- Chapter 6 Seaweed and Mangroves58; Improving Environmental Practices in Coastal Communities to Secure Sustainable Livelihoods -- Chapter 7 Political Organisation and Socioeconomics of Fishing Communities of Trinidad and Tobago44; Belize44; and Grenada -- Chapter 8 Analytical Insights44; Lessons Learnt44; and Recommendations -- Contributors -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y -- Last Page.

"This volume deals with community-based coastal resource management (CBCRM) in the insular and continental Caribbean. Supported by a small-grant programme from the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and undertaken in collaboration with the International Ocean Institute (IOI) in Costa Rica and the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) in Belize, it summarises the results of a second phase that took place between January 2002 and February 2005. This programme was composed of 15 projects in 11 countries, with research teams coming from university research centres and various non-governmental organisations (NGOs). It was designed to better understand the heterogeneity of the Caribbean communities by taking a critical look at existing natural resource management (NRM) approaches in which, in our view, insufficient attention has been paid to the diversity of social institutions and ecosystems working at various scales in the management processes. During Phase I, results of the project were summarised in individual case studies. In Phase II, more structured exchanges produced collective writing efforts, which gave the study a stronger comparative and analytical orientation. In addition to chapters dealing with analytical and methodological issues in coastal management, the essence of the volume lies in five comparative and synthesised case studies that focus on particular management problems in diverse social contexts. Although this text is written primarily for a research audience, it should be of interest to coastal planners, decision makers, and funding agency representatives because this type of thinking needs to be shared far more widely among these groups in the Caribbean. For instance, we argue that particular attention should be given to reaching a better balance between natural and social sciences in the management of natural resources. We also need to deepen our understanding of local human contexts as part of the increasing tendency to decentralisation in many areas of the world. We hope that participants, individuals, and institutions have learned several lessons from this experience and that the programme will remain a valid, illustrative basis for further involvement in Caribbean coastal management issues. The preparation of this book was funded by the IDRC. The editors and authors would like to thank Dr Alejandro Guti�errez, Director del International Oceans Institute in Costa Rica, and Hugh Saul, Director of the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism in Belize, for their dedicated administrative support of this CBCRM programme in the Caribbean. We are also grateful to Manon Ruel and Sandra Baron, graduate students in anthropology at the Universit�e Laval, Qu�ebec, Canada, for regularly submitting documentation to the projects and participating in finalising this publication."--Pref.

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