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Digital inclusion, teens, and your library [electronic resource] : exploring the issues and acting on them / Lesley S.J. Farmer.

By: Farmer, Lesley S. J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Libraries Unlimited professional guides for young adult librarians: Publisher: Westport, Conn. : Libraries Unlimited, 2005Description: 1 online resource (xix, 176 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9781429472906 (electronic bk.); 1429472901 (electronic bk.); 1281110701; 9781281110701.Subject(s): Libraries and teenagers -- United States | Internet in young adults' libraries -- United States | Internet and teenagers -- United States | Technology and youth -- United States | Digital divide -- United States | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES -- Library & Information Science -- Archives & Special LibrariesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Digital inclusion, teens, and your library.DDC classification: 027.62/6 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- Series Foreword -- Introduction -- Dimensions of Technology Equity -- The Librarys Role -- Fostering Digital Inclusion -- 1 Laying the Groundwork -- Qualities of Youth45;Serving Librarians -- Personal Qualities -- Professional Qualities -- Interactions with Teens -- Qualities of Libraries Serving Teens -- Libraries and Communities -- Identifying Community Collaborators -- Building Coalitions -- Public Relations -- Advocacy -- Community Links -- A Word of Caution -- 2 Teens in Need of Technology -- Todays Adolescents -- Adolescent Development -- Underserved Groups -- Poor -- Homeless -- Teens of Color -- Immigrants -- English Language Learners -- Migrant Farmworkers -- Rural and Isolated Populations -- Gang Members -- Incarcerated Youth -- School Dropouts -- Teenage Parents -- Girls -- The Disabled -- Implications for Libraries -- 3 Technology and Life after High School58; Education44; Work44; Citizenship -- Jobs47;Employment -- Information Literacy and Technology -- Communications Technology -- Programs for Careers and Technology -- Further Education -- Citizenship47;Politics -- Targeted Teens on the Fringes of the Future -- Inner45;City Youth -- Girls -- Teens with Disabilities -- 4 Perceptions of Technology -- Common Misconceptions about Technology and Who Has Them -- Why Should Teens Care About Technology63; -- Getting the Word Out -- The Big Picture -- 5 Physical Access to Technology -- Home Access -- Connectivity -- The Other Access -- The School Picture -- Community Access Points -- Libraries -- Special Access Issues for People with Disabilities -- Supporting Web Sites -- 6 Technical Access to Technology -- What Is There to Learn63; -- How Do Teens Learn to Use Technology63; -- Instructional Issues -- Venues for Learning -- Referral Services -- Training at the Library -- Partnerships -- Online Training -- 7 Intellectual Access to Technology -- The Technology World -- Information Literacy -- Locating Information -- Evaluating and Selecting Information -- Using Information -- Sharing and Acting on Information -- Media Literacy -- Information Literacy Web Sites -- 8 Digital Content for Teens -- Relevant Content -- Local Information -- Education -- Language Issues -- Creating Content -- 9 Use of Technology by Teens -- Development of Technology Use -- Independent Technology Use -- Teen Technology Use in Schools -- Service Learning -- Best Practice -- Teen Technology Use in Libraries -- Teen Technology Use in Communities -- 10 A Call to Action -- Procedures for Action -- Best Practice -- Your Turn -- Bibliography -- Index -- Last Page.
Summary: Shows how to help technologically disadvantaged teens to overcome barriers and become tech-savvy The digital divide is a disturbing reality, and teens increasingly fall into distinct categories of technological "haves" and "have-nots," whether or not computers are available to them in the schools. This trend undermines the futures of our youth and jeopardizes the vitality of society. Today's librarians are in a unique position to help bridge the gap. This guide helps librarians to identify the "tech-nots"--Technologically disadvantaged teens - in a community or school and to reach out and build information literacy in underserved teen populations. The author goes beyond recommending computers for every teen, and demonstrates how to overcome teen misperceptions and disinterest in computers. After examining the problem and the populations most affected, the author discusses how to build awareness and motivation, train staff, create space and time, build the collection, develop partnerships with other agencies and organizations, offer services, and overcome barriers with specific populations.; Citing benchmark programmes and services, Farmer offers a wealth of exciting new ways for libraries to connect with at-risk teens today.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [159]-172) and index.

Cover -- Contents -- Series Foreword -- Introduction -- Dimensions of Technology Equity -- The Librarys Role -- Fostering Digital Inclusion -- 1 Laying the Groundwork -- Qualities of Youth45;Serving Librarians -- Personal Qualities -- Professional Qualities -- Interactions with Teens -- Qualities of Libraries Serving Teens -- Libraries and Communities -- Identifying Community Collaborators -- Building Coalitions -- Public Relations -- Advocacy -- Community Links -- A Word of Caution -- 2 Teens in Need of Technology -- Todays Adolescents -- Adolescent Development -- Underserved Groups -- Poor -- Homeless -- Teens of Color -- Immigrants -- English Language Learners -- Migrant Farmworkers -- Rural and Isolated Populations -- Gang Members -- Incarcerated Youth -- School Dropouts -- Teenage Parents -- Girls -- The Disabled -- Implications for Libraries -- 3 Technology and Life after High School58; Education44; Work44; Citizenship -- Jobs47;Employment -- Information Literacy and Technology -- Communications Technology -- Programs for Careers and Technology -- Further Education -- Citizenship47;Politics -- Targeted Teens on the Fringes of the Future -- Inner45;City Youth -- Girls -- Teens with Disabilities -- 4 Perceptions of Technology -- Common Misconceptions about Technology and Who Has Them -- Why Should Teens Care About Technology63; -- Getting the Word Out -- The Big Picture -- 5 Physical Access to Technology -- Home Access -- Connectivity -- The Other Access -- The School Picture -- Community Access Points -- Libraries -- Special Access Issues for People with Disabilities -- Supporting Web Sites -- 6 Technical Access to Technology -- What Is There to Learn63; -- How Do Teens Learn to Use Technology63; -- Instructional Issues -- Venues for Learning -- Referral Services -- Training at the Library -- Partnerships -- Online Training -- 7 Intellectual Access to Technology -- The Technology World -- Information Literacy -- Locating Information -- Evaluating and Selecting Information -- Using Information -- Sharing and Acting on Information -- Media Literacy -- Information Literacy Web Sites -- 8 Digital Content for Teens -- Relevant Content -- Local Information -- Education -- Language Issues -- Creating Content -- 9 Use of Technology by Teens -- Development of Technology Use -- Independent Technology Use -- Teen Technology Use in Schools -- Service Learning -- Best Practice -- Teen Technology Use in Libraries -- Teen Technology Use in Communities -- 10 A Call to Action -- Procedures for Action -- Best Practice -- Your Turn -- Bibliography -- Index -- Last Page.

Shows how to help technologically disadvantaged teens to overcome barriers and become tech-savvy The digital divide is a disturbing reality, and teens increasingly fall into distinct categories of technological "haves" and "have-nots," whether or not computers are available to them in the schools. This trend undermines the futures of our youth and jeopardizes the vitality of society. Today's librarians are in a unique position to help bridge the gap. This guide helps librarians to identify the "tech-nots"--Technologically disadvantaged teens - in a community or school and to reach out and build information literacy in underserved teen populations. The author goes beyond recommending computers for every teen, and demonstrates how to overcome teen misperceptions and disinterest in computers. After examining the problem and the populations most affected, the author discusses how to build awareness and motivation, train staff, create space and time, build the collection, develop partnerships with other agencies and organizations, offer services, and overcome barriers with specific populations.; Citing benchmark programmes and services, Farmer offers a wealth of exciting new ways for libraries to connect with at-risk teens today.

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Digital inclusion, teens, and your library by Farmer, Lesley S. J. ©2005
Library, Documentation and Information Science Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B T Road, Kolkata 700108, INDIA
Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


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