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Saving sickly children [electronic resource] : the tuberculosis preventorium in American life, 1909-1970 / Cynthia A. Connolly.

By: Connolly, Cynthia A. (Cynthia Anne).
Material type: TextTextSeries: Critical issues in health and medicine: Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2008Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 182 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780813545943 (electronic bk.); 0813545943 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Tuberculosis in children -- United States -- Prevention -- History | Tuberculosis -- Hospitals -- United States -- History | Children -- Hospitals -- United States -- History | Tuberculosis -- United States -- History | Child -- United States | Child, Institutionalized -- United States -- History | History, 20th Century -- United States | Patient Isolation -- United States -- History | Tuberculosis -- nursing -- United States | Tuberculosis -- prevention & control -- United States | MEDICAL -- Infectious Diseases | HEALTH & FITNESS -- Diseases -- ContagiousGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Saving sickly children.DDC classification: 362.196/995 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Child-saving in the United States -- Tuberculosis: a children's disease -- Founding the preventorium -- The preventorium goes nationwide -- Science and the preventorium -- Tuberculosis in the "world of tomorrow" -- Conclusion: saving children, yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
Summary: Known as "The Great Killer" and "The White Plague," few diseases influenced American life as much as tuberculosis. Sufferers migrated to mountain or desert climates believed to ameliorate symptoms. Architects designed homes with sleeping porches and verandas so sufferers could spend time in the open air. The disease even developed its own consumer culture complete with invalid beds, spittoons, sputum collection devices, and disinfectants. The "preventorium," an institution designed to protect children from the ravages of the disease, emerged in this era of Progres.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Child-saving in the United States -- Tuberculosis: a children's disease -- Founding the preventorium -- The preventorium goes nationwide -- Science and the preventorium -- Tuberculosis in the "world of tomorrow" -- Conclusion: saving children, yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

Description based on print version record.

Known as "The Great Killer" and "The White Plague," few diseases influenced American life as much as tuberculosis. Sufferers migrated to mountain or desert climates believed to ameliorate symptoms. Architects designed homes with sleeping porches and verandas so sufferers could spend time in the open air. The disease even developed its own consumer culture complete with invalid beds, spittoons, sputum collection devices, and disinfectants. The "preventorium," an institution designed to protect children from the ravages of the disease, emerged in this era of Progres.

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