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Public space and the ideology of place in American culture [electronic resource] / edited by Miles Orvell & Jeffrey L. Meikle.

Contributor(s): Orvell, Miles | Meikle, Jeffrey L, 1949-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Architecture, technology, culture: 3.Publisher: Amsterdam ; New York : Rodopi, 2009Description: 1 online resource (460 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 9789042025745 (hbk. : alk. paper); 9042025743 (hbk. : alk. paper); 9781441613400 (electronic bk.); 1441613404 (electronic bk.); 9789042028784; 9042028785.Subject(s): Public spaces -- United States -- Congresses | Public architecture -- United States -- Congresses | Social Science | ART -- GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Public space and the ideology of place in American culture.DDC classification: 720.973 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Contents; Introduction; Part One: Public Space as Symbol; Planning a National Pantheon: Monuments in Washington, D.C. and the Creation of Symbolic Space; "How the Devil It Got There": The Politics of Form and Function in the Smithsonian "Castle"; The Museum of Appalachia and the Invention of an Idyllic Past; Constructing Main Street: Utopia and the Imagined Past; Pasteboard Views: Idealizing Public Space in American Postcards, 19311953; Part Two: Contesting Public Space; "Terra Incognita" in the Heart of the City? Montreal and Mount Royal Around 1900.
Summary: We typically take public space for granted, as if it has continuously been there, yet public space has always been the expression of the will of some agency (person or institution) who names the space, gives it purpose, and monitors its existence. And often its use has been contested. These new essays, written for this volume, approach public space through several key questions: Who has the right to define public space? How do such places generate and sustain symbolic meaning? Is public space unchanging, or is it subject to our subjective perception? Do we, given the public nature of public sp.
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Includes bibliographical references.

Contents; Introduction; Part One: Public Space as Symbol; Planning a National Pantheon: Monuments in Washington, D.C. and the Creation of Symbolic Space; "How the Devil It Got There": The Politics of Form and Function in the Smithsonian "Castle"; The Museum of Appalachia and the Invention of an Idyllic Past; Constructing Main Street: Utopia and the Imagined Past; Pasteboard Views: Idealizing Public Space in American Postcards, 19311953; Part Two: Contesting Public Space; "Terra Incognita" in the Heart of the City? Montreal and Mount Royal Around 1900.

We typically take public space for granted, as if it has continuously been there, yet public space has always been the expression of the will of some agency (person or institution) who names the space, gives it purpose, and monitors its existence. And often its use has been contested. These new essays, written for this volume, approach public space through several key questions: Who has the right to define public space? How do such places generate and sustain symbolic meaning? Is public space unchanging, or is it subject to our subjective perception? Do we, given the public nature of public sp.

Description based on print version record.

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