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Peer to peer and the music industry [electronic resource] : the criminalization of sharing / Matthew David.

By: David, Matthew.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Theory, culture & society (Unnumbered): Publisher: Los Angeles : SAGE, c2010Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 186 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9781849204309 (electronic bk.); 1849204306 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Music trade | Music trade -- Corrupt practices | Peer-to-peer architecture (Computer networks) | Downloading of data | ART -- Business AspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Peer to peer and the music industry.DDC classification: 338.477802854652 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
1. Introduction -- 2. The Global Network Society: Territorialization and Deterritorialization -- 3. File-sharing: A Brief History -- 4. Markets and Monopolies in Informational Goods: Intellectual Property Rights and Protectionism -- 5. Legal Genealogies -- 6. Technical Mythologies and Security Risks -- 7. Media Management -- 9. Alternative Cultural Models of Participation, Communication and Reward? -- 10. Conclusions -- References -- Index.
Summary: "'Matthew David has done a rare and valuable thing with this work. He has comprehensively exposed the inherent radicalism of peer-to-peer communication and exposed the absurdities of the various efforts to quash the practice and technologies. This book is certain to outlast the recording industry' - Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Media Studies, University of Virginia. Have the music and movie industries lost the battle to criminalize downloading? This penetrating and informative book provides readers with the perfect systematic critical guide to the file-sharing phenomenon. Combining inter-disciplinary resources from sociology, history, media and communication studies and cultural studies, Matthew David unpacks the economics, psychology, and philosophy of file-sharing. The book carefully situates the reader in a field of relevant approaches including Network Society Theory, Post-structuralism, and ethnographic research. It uses this to launch into a fascinating enquiry into: The rise of file-sharing, The challenge to intellectual property law posed by new technologies of communication, The social psychology of cyber crime, The response of the mass media and multi-national corporations. The book concludes with a balanced, eye-opening assessment of alternative cultural modes of participation and their relationship to creative capitalism. This is a key work in the sociology of popular culture and cultural criminology. It fuses a deep knowledge of the music industry and the new technologies of mass communication with a powerful perspective on how multinational corporations operate to monopolize markets, how international and state agencies defend property, while a global multitude undermine and/or reinvent both. It will be of interest to students of sociology, criminology, media and communications and cultural studies"--Provided by publisher.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Introduction -- 2. The Global Network Society: Territorialization and Deterritorialization -- 3. File-sharing: A Brief History -- 4. Markets and Monopolies in Informational Goods: Intellectual Property Rights and Protectionism -- 5. Legal Genealogies -- 6. Technical Mythologies and Security Risks -- 7. Media Management -- 9. Alternative Cultural Models of Participation, Communication and Reward? -- 10. Conclusions -- References -- Index.

"'Matthew David has done a rare and valuable thing with this work. He has comprehensively exposed the inherent radicalism of peer-to-peer communication and exposed the absurdities of the various efforts to quash the practice and technologies. This book is certain to outlast the recording industry' - Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Media Studies, University of Virginia. Have the music and movie industries lost the battle to criminalize downloading? This penetrating and informative book provides readers with the perfect systematic critical guide to the file-sharing phenomenon. Combining inter-disciplinary resources from sociology, history, media and communication studies and cultural studies, Matthew David unpacks the economics, psychology, and philosophy of file-sharing. The book carefully situates the reader in a field of relevant approaches including Network Society Theory, Post-structuralism, and ethnographic research. It uses this to launch into a fascinating enquiry into: The rise of file-sharing, The challenge to intellectual property law posed by new technologies of communication, The social psychology of cyber crime, The response of the mass media and multi-national corporations. The book concludes with a balanced, eye-opening assessment of alternative cultural modes of participation and their relationship to creative capitalism. This is a key work in the sociology of popular culture and cultural criminology. It fuses a deep knowledge of the music industry and the new technologies of mass communication with a powerful perspective on how multinational corporations operate to monopolize markets, how international and state agencies defend property, while a global multitude undermine and/or reinvent both. It will be of interest to students of sociology, criminology, media and communications and cultural studies"--Provided by publisher.

Description based on print version record.

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Other editions of this work

Peer to peer and the music industry by David, Matthew. ©2010
Peer to peer and the music industry by David, Matthew. ©2010
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