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Sloss Furnaces and the rise of the Birmingham district [electronic resource] : an industrial epic / W. David Lewis.

By: Lewis, W. David (Walter David), 1931-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: History of American science and technology series: Publisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c1994Description: 1 online resource (xxiv, 645 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 9780817385613 (electronic bk.); 0817385614 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Sloss Furnace Company -- History | Iron industry and trade -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History | Iron foundries -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History | Iron founding -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History | Iron -- Metallurgy | Industries -- Alabama -- Birmingham -- History | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Economic conditions | Birmingham (Ala.) -- Social conditions | Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark -- History | Sloss Furnace Company | Geschichte | Eisengie�erei | Eisen- und Stahlindustrie | Birmingham (Ala.) | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Corporate & Business History | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Infrastructure | Sloss Furnace Company -- History | Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sloss Furnaces and the rise of the Birmingham district.DDC classification: 338.7/6722/09761781 Online resources: EBSCOhost Summary: Sloss Furnaces and the Rise of the Birmingham District contradicts earlier interpretations of southern industrialization by showing that Birmingham, which became a leading symbol of the New South, was in fact deeply rooted in the antebellum plantation system and its "peculiar institution," slavery. As Lewis demonstrates, southern businessmen pursued their own indigenous model of economic growth and were selective in how they imported capital, machinery, and technical expertise from outside the region. The racial crises that erupted in Birmingham during the 1960s can be traced, in part, to labor-intensive developmental strategies that were present from the birth of a city that might have become a bastion of industrial slavery if the South had won the Civil War.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 583-610) and index.

Sloss Furnaces and the Rise of the Birmingham District contradicts earlier interpretations of southern industrialization by showing that Birmingham, which became a leading symbol of the New South, was in fact deeply rooted in the antebellum plantation system and its "peculiar institution," slavery. As Lewis demonstrates, southern businessmen pursued their own indigenous model of economic growth and were selective in how they imported capital, machinery, and technical expertise from outside the region. The racial crises that erupted in Birmingham during the 1960s can be traced, in part, to labor-intensive developmental strategies that were present from the birth of a city that might have become a bastion of industrial slavery if the South had won the Civil War.

Description based on print version record.

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Sloss Furnaces and the rise of the Birmingham district by Lewis, W. David ©1994
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