Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)
Library,Documentation and Information Science Division

“A research journal serves that narrow

borderland which separates the known from the unknown”

-P.C.Mahalanobis


Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The ethics of obscene speech in early Christianity and its environment [electronic resource] / by Jeremy F. Hultin.

By: Hultin, Jeremy F.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Supplements to Novum Testamentum: v. 128.Publisher: Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2008Description: 1 online resource (xxi, 279 p.).ISBN: 9789047433675 (electronic bk.); 904743367X (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Clean speech | Oral communication -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | RELIGION -- Christian Theology -- Ethics | Religi�ose Sprache | Fr�uhchristentum | Literatur | Obsz�onit�at | ReligionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ethics of obscene speech in early Christianity and its environment.DDC classification: 241/.69509015 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
A survey of foul language in the ancient world -- What is foul language? -- Plato and Aristotle on foul language -- Plato and the dangers of mimesis -- Aristotle and the bounds of humor -- Abuse -- Laws against slander -- Religious rites -- Excursus : the language of some love charms -- Comedy -- New forms of comic drama -- Literary obscenities -- Epigram -- Tales of sexual adventures and sex manuals -- Ovid's culpa -- Speech, character, and self-definition -- Speech as it relates to character -- Speech as it defined specific groups -- Cynics and shameless speech -- Stoics -- The linguistic roots of the stoic ethics of foul language -- Excursus : Bryson the Megarian -- Changes in stoic (and cynic) views of obscene speech -- Jewish scripture and earliest Christianity -- Prophetic scatology -- Wisdom literature and Ben Sirach -- Jesus -- James -- Didache 3:3 and the two ways -- Paul -- Galatians 5:12 -- Philippians 3:8: [Greek text] -- Colossians and Ephesians -- Colossians 3:8 -- Colossians 4:6 : "season your speech with salt" -- Ephesians -- Exegesis of Ephesians 5:3-14 -- "Let them not even be named among you" (Eph 5:3) -- "Shameful even to mention" (Eph 5:12) -- Speech rules in 1QS -- Profaning a sanctum -- Not fitting for holy ones -- Speech and Christian identities -- Clement of Alexandria on foul language -- The divine paedagogue and Christian manners -- On foul language -- Excursus : Clement and the Didache -- A "deeper logos" about foul language -- Comparing Clement.
Summary: This book aims to contextualize early Christian rhetoric about foul language by asking such questions as: Where was foul language encountered? What were the conventional arguments for avoiding (or for using) obscene words? How would the avoidance of such speech have been interpreted by others? A careful examination of the ancient uses of and discourse about foul language illuminates the moral logic implicit in various Jewish and Christian texts (e.g. "Sirach", "Colossians", "Ephesians", the "Didache", and the writings of Clement of Alexandria). Although
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references (p. [241]-260) and index.

A survey of foul language in the ancient world -- What is foul language? -- Plato and Aristotle on foul language -- Plato and the dangers of mimesis -- Aristotle and the bounds of humor -- Abuse -- Laws against slander -- Religious rites -- Excursus : the language of some love charms -- Comedy -- New forms of comic drama -- Literary obscenities -- Epigram -- Tales of sexual adventures and sex manuals -- Ovid's culpa -- Speech, character, and self-definition -- Speech as it relates to character -- Speech as it defined specific groups -- Cynics and shameless speech -- Stoics -- The linguistic roots of the stoic ethics of foul language -- Excursus : Bryson the Megarian -- Changes in stoic (and cynic) views of obscene speech -- Jewish scripture and earliest Christianity -- Prophetic scatology -- Wisdom literature and Ben Sirach -- Jesus -- James -- Didache 3:3 and the two ways -- Paul -- Galatians 5:12 -- Philippians 3:8: [Greek text] -- Colossians and Ephesians -- Colossians 3:8 -- Colossians 4:6 : "season your speech with salt" -- Ephesians -- Exegesis of Ephesians 5:3-14 -- "Let them not even be named among you" (Eph 5:3) -- "Shameful even to mention" (Eph 5:12) -- Speech rules in 1QS -- Profaning a sanctum -- Not fitting for holy ones -- Speech and Christian identities -- Clement of Alexandria on foul language -- The divine paedagogue and Christian manners -- On foul language -- Excursus : Clement and the Didache -- A "deeper logos" about foul language -- Comparing Clement.

Description based on print version record.

This book aims to contextualize early Christian rhetoric about foul language by asking such questions as: Where was foul language encountered? What were the conventional arguments for avoiding (or for using) obscene words? How would the avoidance of such speech have been interpreted by others? A careful examination of the ancient uses of and discourse about foul language illuminates the moral logic implicit in various Jewish and Christian texts (e.g. "Sirach", "Colossians", "Ephesians", the "Didache", and the writings of Clement of Alexandria). Although

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Other editions of this work

The ethics of obscene speech in early Christianity and its environment by Hultin, Jeremy F. ©2008
Library, Documentation and Information Science Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B T Road, Kolkata 700108, INDIA
Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


Visitor Counter