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Near-term opportunities for integrating biomass into the U.S. electricity supply [electronic resource] : technical considerations / David S. Ortiz ... [et al.].

Contributor(s): Ortiz, David (David Santana) | Rand Environment, Energy, and Economic Development (Program) | Rand Corporation.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Technical report (Rand Corporation): TR-984-NETL.Publisher: Santa Monica, Calif. : Rand, 2011Description: 1 online resource (xxiii, 161 p.) : ill., maps (digital, PDF file).ISBN: 9780833058461 (electronic bk.); 0833058460 (electronic bk.).Report number: RAND TR-984-NETLSubject(s): Biomass energy -- United States | Electric power-plants -- United States -- Fuel | Electric power production -- United States | NATURE / Animals / Wildlife | SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Biological DiversityGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Near-term opportunities for integrating biomass into the U.S. electricity supply.DDC classification: 333.95/39 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Introduction -- Cofiring experience in the United States -- Plant-site costs of cofiring -- Near-term potential demand for biomass for cofiring applications -- Logistical considerations -- Reductions in life-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions from cofiring with biomass -- Conclusions -- Appendix A: additional details from facility interviews -- Appendix B: supporting information for plant-site costs of cofiring -- Appendix C: state summaries of biomass use and potential demand -- Appendix D: Logistics analysis documentation -- Appendix E: calculation of net greenhouse-gas emissions from biomass cofiring.
Summary: "In light of potential regulatory limits on greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions, requirements for greater use of renewable fuels, and higher prices for some conventional fossil resources, over the course of the next few decades, biomass is expected to become an increasingly important source of electricity, heat, and liquid fuel. One near-term option for using biomass to generate electricity is to cofire biomass in coal-fired electricity plants. Doing so allows such plants to reduce GHG emissions and, in appropriate regulatory environments, to generate renewable-energy credits to recover costs. This report focuses on two aspects of biomass use: plant-site modifications, changes in operations, and costs associated with cofiring biomass; and the logistical issues associated with delivering biomass to the plant. The authors find that the main challenge is maintaining a consistent fuel supply; technical and regulatory factors can drive the decision to cofire; cofiring can increase costs, decrease revenue, and reduce GHG emissions; densification does not reduce plant costs but can reduce transportation costs, however current markets cannot support use of densified fuels."--Provided by publisher.
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Includes bibliographical references: p. 157-161.

"Sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory."

"Rand Environment, Energy, and Economic Development."

Introduction -- Cofiring experience in the United States -- Plant-site costs of cofiring -- Near-term potential demand for biomass for cofiring applications -- Logistical considerations -- Reductions in life-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions from cofiring with biomass -- Conclusions -- Appendix A: additional details from facility interviews -- Appendix B: supporting information for plant-site costs of cofiring -- Appendix C: state summaries of biomass use and potential demand -- Appendix D: Logistics analysis documentation -- Appendix E: calculation of net greenhouse-gas emissions from biomass cofiring.

"In light of potential regulatory limits on greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions, requirements for greater use of renewable fuels, and higher prices for some conventional fossil resources, over the course of the next few decades, biomass is expected to become an increasingly important source of electricity, heat, and liquid fuel. One near-term option for using biomass to generate electricity is to cofire biomass in coal-fired electricity plants. Doing so allows such plants to reduce GHG emissions and, in appropriate regulatory environments, to generate renewable-energy credits to recover costs. This report focuses on two aspects of biomass use: plant-site modifications, changes in operations, and costs associated with cofiring biomass; and the logistical issues associated with delivering biomass to the plant. The authors find that the main challenge is maintaining a consistent fuel supply; technical and regulatory factors can drive the decision to cofire; cofiring can increase costs, decrease revenue, and reduce GHG emissions; densification does not reduce plant costs but can reduce transportation costs, however current markets cannot support use of densified fuels."--Provided by publisher.

Title from PDF title screen (viewed on Aug. 5, 2011).

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