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What the bones say [electronic resource] : Tasmanian aborigines, science and domination / John J. Cove.

By: Cove, John J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Ottawa : Carleton University Press, c1995Description: 1 online resource (xi, 221 p.) : map.ISBN: 9780773581456 (electronic bk.); 0773581456 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Anthropological ethics | Anthropology -- Political aspects | Indigenous peoples -- Research -- Australia -- Tasmania | Indigenous peoples -- Research | Social sciences -- Research -- Moral and ethical aspects | Social sciences -- Research -- Political aspects | Anthropologues -- D�eontologie | Anthropologie -- Aspect politique | Autochtones -- Recherche -- Australie -- Tasmanie | Autochtones -- Recherche | Sciences sociales -- Recherche -- Aspect moral | Sciences sociales -- Recherche -- Aspect politique | Ethnoarch�aologie | Geschichte 1803-1992 | B�urgerrecht | Tasmanien | Aborigines | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Business EthicsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: What the bones say.DDC classification: 174/.9309 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
I. Anthropology and the Politics of Contemporary Research -- II. The Early Colonial Period (1803-76) -- III. The Science and Politics of Race (1876-1950) -- IV. Old Science and New Realities (1951-90) -- V. Bones and Other Objects of Contention (1951-92) -- VI. Ethics in the Human Sciences.
Summary: What the Bones Say is a thoroughly engaging history of one line of human science research and its consequences for the hapless and often helpless subject of study: the indigenous peoples of Tasmania. Research questions arising from skeletal remains were posed and pursued on the assumption that vanished forebears bore no relation to, nor had any intrinsic meaning for, aboriginal Tasmanians of today. The author finds these premises incorrect, exposing both the biases of research done for political ends, and documenting their galvanizing effect on indigenous status and land claims, ownership of skeletal remains, the political mobilization of Aboriginal interests, and native advocacy.
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Includes bibliographical references.

I. Anthropology and the Politics of Contemporary Research -- II. The Early Colonial Period (1803-76) -- III. The Science and Politics of Race (1876-1950) -- IV. Old Science and New Realities (1951-90) -- V. Bones and Other Objects of Contention (1951-92) -- VI. Ethics in the Human Sciences.

What the Bones Say is a thoroughly engaging history of one line of human science research and its consequences for the hapless and often helpless subject of study: the indigenous peoples of Tasmania. Research questions arising from skeletal remains were posed and pursued on the assumption that vanished forebears bore no relation to, nor had any intrinsic meaning for, aboriginal Tasmanians of today. The author finds these premises incorrect, exposing both the biases of research done for political ends, and documenting their galvanizing effect on indigenous status and land claims, ownership of skeletal remains, the political mobilization of Aboriginal interests, and native advocacy.

Description based on print version record.

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Other editions of this work

What the bones say by Cove, John J. ©1995
Ethnographic feminisms ©1995
Ethnographic feminisms ©1995
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