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African American religion and the civil rights movement in Arkansas [electronic resource] / Johnny E. Williams.

By: Williams, Johnny E.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2003Description: 1 online resource (xxv, 177 p.).ISBN: 9781604735840 (electronic bk.); 1604735848 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- Arkansas -- History | Civil rights movements -- Arkansas -- History | African American civil rights workers -- Religious life -- Arkansas | African Americans -- Arkansas -- Religion | African American churches -- Arkansas -- History | Religion and politics -- Arkansas -- History | Arkansas -- Race relations | Arkansas -- Church history | B�urgerrecht | B�urgerrechtsbewegung | Politik | Religion | Arkansas | Schwarze | RELIGION / Christian Life / Social Issues | RELIGION / Christianity / GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: African American religion and the civil rights movement in Arkansas.DDC classification: 261.7/089/960730767 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Cultural dimensions of collective action -- History of activist religious interpretation -- Church culture and sociopolitical movements during Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction -- Social activism preceding the desegregation movement in Little Rock -- Religion's effect on mobilizing civil rights protest -- Culture's centrality in African-American women's civil rights activism -- Theoretical conclusions.
Summary: Civil Rights -- Religious History--& What role did religion play in sparking the call for civil rights? Was the African American church a motivating force or a calming eddy? The conventional view among scholars of the period is that religion as a source for social activism was marginal, conservative, or pacifying. Not so, argues Johnny E. Williams. Focusing on the state of Arkansas as typical in the role of ecclesiastical activism, his book argues that black religion from the period of slavery through the era of segregation provided theological resources that motivated and sustained preachers
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 162-171) and index.

Cultural dimensions of collective action -- History of activist religious interpretation -- Church culture and sociopolitical movements during Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction -- Social activism preceding the desegregation movement in Little Rock -- Religion's effect on mobilizing civil rights protest -- Culture's centrality in African-American women's civil rights activism -- Theoretical conclusions.

Description based on print version record.

Civil Rights -- Religious History--& What role did religion play in sparking the call for civil rights? Was the African American church a motivating force or a calming eddy? The conventional view among scholars of the period is that religion as a source for social activism was marginal, conservative, or pacifying. Not so, argues Johnny E. Williams. Focusing on the state of Arkansas as typical in the role of ecclesiastical activism, his book argues that black religion from the period of slavery through the era of segregation provided theological resources that motivated and sustained preachers

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African American religion and the civil rights movement in Arkansas by Williams, Johnny E. ©2003
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