Online Public Access Catalogue (OPAC)
Library,Documentation and Information Science Division

“A research journal serves that narrow

borderland which separates the known from the unknown”

-P.C.Mahalanobis


Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Death and survival in the book of Job [electronic resource] : desymbolization and traumatic experience / Dan Mathewson.

By: Mathewson, Dan, 1973-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament studies: 450.; T & T Clark library of biblical studies: Publisher: New York : T & T Clark, c2006Description: 1 online resource (vii, 202 p.).ISBN: 9780567171900 (electronic bk.); 0567171906 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Bible. Job -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Death -- Biblical teaching | Death | Bible. A.T. Job -- Critique, interpr�etation, etc | Mort -- Enseignement biblique | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- Old Testament | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- Wisdom Literature | Job (bijbelboek)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Death and survival in the book of Job.DDC classification: 223/.106 Other classification: 11.41 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Introduction: death and divine justice -- Symbolic wholeness and life, desymbolization and death (chapters 1-2) -- Desymbolized death in job's early speeches (chapters 3-20, part one) -- Shifting death and the legal metaphor (chapters 3-20, part two) -- Generalized speech and resymbolization (chapters 21-31) -- Divine speeches: symbolic fluidity and the protean self (38:1-42:6) -- Conclusion: death at the end and the questions of symbolic wholeness and meaning.
Summary: The Book of Job functions as literature of survival where the main character, Job, deals with the trauma of suffering, attempts to come to terms with a collapsed moral and theological world, and eventually re-connects the broken pieces of his world into a new moral universe, which explains and contains the trauma of his recent experiences and renders his life meaningful again.�The key�is Job's death imagery. In fact, with its depiction of death in the prose tale and its frequent discussions of death in the poetic sections, Job may be the most death-oriented book in the bible. In part.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Includes bibliographical references (p. [171]-183) and indexes.

Introduction: death and divine justice -- Symbolic wholeness and life, desymbolization and death (chapters 1-2) -- Desymbolized death in job's early speeches (chapters 3-20, part one) -- Shifting death and the legal metaphor (chapters 3-20, part two) -- Generalized speech and resymbolization (chapters 21-31) -- Divine speeches: symbolic fluidity and the protean self (38:1-42:6) -- Conclusion: death at the end and the questions of symbolic wholeness and meaning.

The Book of Job functions as literature of survival where the main character, Job, deals with the trauma of suffering, attempts to come to terms with a collapsed moral and theological world, and eventually re-connects the broken pieces of his world into a new moral universe, which explains and contains the trauma of his recent experiences and renders his life meaningful again.�The key�is Job's death imagery. In fact, with its depiction of death in the prose tale and its frequent discussions of death in the poetic sections, Job may be the most death-oriented book in the bible. In part.

Description based on print version record.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Other editions of this work

Death and survival in the book of Job by Mathewson, Dan, ©2006
Library, Documentation and Information Science Division, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B T Road, Kolkata 700108, INDIA
Phone no. 91-33-2575 2100, Fax no. 91-33-2578 1412, ksatpathy@isical.ac.in


Visitor Counter