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Reading dreams [electronic resource] : an audience-critical approach to the dreams in the Gospel of Matthew / Derek S. Dodson.

By: Dodson, Derek S.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Library of New Testament studies: 397.; T & T Clark library of biblical studies: Publisher: London ; New York, NY : T & T Clark, c2009Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 214 p.).ISBN: 9780567153203 (electronic bk.); 0567153207 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Bible. Matthew -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Dreams in the Bible | Dreams -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | Religion | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- New Testament | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- Jesus, the Gospels & Acts | Matth�ausevangelium | Traum | Erz�ahltechnik | Literarkritik | FormgeschichteGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reading dreams.DDC classification: 226.206 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Chapter one. Introduction -- Chapter two. The ancient, social context of dreams -- Chapter three. The ancient, literary context of dreams, part I : the script of dreams -- Chapter four. The ancient, literary context of dreams, part II : the literary functions of dreams -- Chapter five. Dreams in the Gospel of Matthew -- Chapter six. Conclusion -- Appendix. The Matthean transfiguration as a dream-vision report.
Summary: Dodson reads the dreams in the Gospel of Matthew (1:18b-25; 2:12, 13-15, 19-21, 22; 27:19) as the authorial audience. This approach requires an understanding of the social and literary character of dreams in the Greco-Roman world. Dodson describes the social function of dreams, noting that dreams constituted one form of divination in the ancient world, and looks at the theories and classification of dreams that developed in the ancient world. He then moves on to demonstrate the literary dimensions of dreams in Greco-Roman literature. This exploration of the literary representation of dreams is nuanced by considering the literary form of dreams, dreams in the Greco-Roman rhetorical tradition, the inventiveness of literary dreams, and the literary function of dreams. The dreams in the Gospel of Matthew are then analyzed in this social and literary context. It is demonstrated that Matthew's use of dreams as a literary convention corresponds to the script of dreams in other Greco-Roman narratives. This correspondence includes the form of the Matthean dreams, dreams as a motif of the birth topos (1:18b-25), the association of dreams and prophecy (1:22-23; 2:15, 23), the use of the double-dream report (2:12 and 2:13-15), and dreams as an ominous sign in relation to an individual's death (27:19). An appendix considers the Matthean transfiguration as a dream-vision report.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [185]-203) and indexes.

Originally presented as the author's thesis (Ph. D.)--Baylor University, 2006.

Chapter one. Introduction -- Chapter two. The ancient, social context of dreams -- Chapter three. The ancient, literary context of dreams, part I : the script of dreams -- Chapter four. The ancient, literary context of dreams, part II : the literary functions of dreams -- Chapter five. Dreams in the Gospel of Matthew -- Chapter six. Conclusion -- Appendix. The Matthean transfiguration as a dream-vision report.

Dodson reads the dreams in the Gospel of Matthew (1:18b-25; 2:12, 13-15, 19-21, 22; 27:19) as the authorial audience. This approach requires an understanding of the social and literary character of dreams in the Greco-Roman world. Dodson describes the social function of dreams, noting that dreams constituted one form of divination in the ancient world, and looks at the theories and classification of dreams that developed in the ancient world. He then moves on to demonstrate the literary dimensions of dreams in Greco-Roman literature. This exploration of the literary representation of dreams is nuanced by considering the literary form of dreams, dreams in the Greco-Roman rhetorical tradition, the inventiveness of literary dreams, and the literary function of dreams. The dreams in the Gospel of Matthew are then analyzed in this social and literary context. It is demonstrated that Matthew's use of dreams as a literary convention corresponds to the script of dreams in other Greco-Roman narratives. This correspondence includes the form of the Matthean dreams, dreams as a motif of the birth topos (1:18b-25), the association of dreams and prophecy (1:22-23; 2:15, 23), the use of the double-dream report (2:12 and 2:13-15), and dreams as an ominous sign in relation to an individual's death (27:19). An appendix considers the Matthean transfiguration as a dream-vision report.

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Reading dreams by Dodson, Derek S. ©2009
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