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Discerning the "word of the Lord" [electronic resource] : the "word of the Lord" in 1 Thessalonians 4:15 / Michael W. Pahl.

By: Pahl, Michael W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Library of New Testament studies: 389.; T & T Clark library of biblical studies: Publisher: London ; New York, NY : T & T Clark, c2009Description: 1 online resource (xii, 203 p.).ISBN: 9780567441461 (electronic bk.); 0567441466 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Bible. N.T. Thessalonians, 1st, IV, 15 -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Word of God (Christian theology) -- Biblical teaching | Religion | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- New Testament | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- Paul's Letters | Paulus (Apostel). Thessalonicherbrief (I.) 4,15 | Jesus Christus -- LogiaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Discerning the "word of the Lord".DDC classification: 227.8106 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Chapter 1. Introduction : the problem of the logos kuriou -- Chapter 2. Solutions to the problem of the logos kuriou -- Chapter 3. An epistemological analysis (1) : prophetic revelation and Jesus tradition -- Chapter 4. An epistemological analysis (2) : scripture and the Christ events -- Chapter 5. A linguistic analysis : Paul's language of divine utterance -- Chapter 6. Contextual analysis : 1 Thessalonians 4.15 in context -- Chapter 7. Conclusion : a fresh solution to the problem of the logos kuriou.
Summary: In 1 Thessalonians 4:15, the Apostle Paul appeals to a "word of the Lord" to provide authority for his eschatological encouragement. This appeal has left a perplexing problem related to the nature and function of the specific authority to which the phrase refers. Two theories have predominated in the history of interpretation: either 1) it refers to a directly received prophetic revelation, whether to Paul or to another Christian prophet; or 2) it refers to a teaching of Jesus received as tradition, whether preserved in the Gospel tradition or otherwise unknown. This book investigates this problem from three angles: epistemological analysis, examining Paul's authorities for his knowledge, particularly in his eschatology; linguistic analysis, including both grammatical and lexical study of the phrase; and contextual analysis, setting the statement within its historical and literary contexts. These approaches converge to suggest a fresh solution to the problem: while Paul does appear to employ traditional Christian eschatological teaching in his response to the Thessalonian crisis (4:16-17a), the phrase logos kuriou does not refer to this tradition, but rather refers to the proclaimed gospel message about Jesus centred on his death and resurrection which forms the theological foundation of Paul's response (cf. 4:14).
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Originally presented as the author's thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Birmingham, 2008.

"A Continuum imprint"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [172]-185) and indexes.

Chapter 1. Introduction : the problem of the logos kuriou -- Chapter 2. Solutions to the problem of the logos kuriou -- Chapter 3. An epistemological analysis (1) : prophetic revelation and Jesus tradition -- Chapter 4. An epistemological analysis (2) : scripture and the Christ events -- Chapter 5. A linguistic analysis : Paul's language of divine utterance -- Chapter 6. Contextual analysis : 1 Thessalonians 4.15 in context -- Chapter 7. Conclusion : a fresh solution to the problem of the logos kuriou.

In 1 Thessalonians 4:15, the Apostle Paul appeals to a "word of the Lord" to provide authority for his eschatological encouragement. This appeal has left a perplexing problem related to the nature and function of the specific authority to which the phrase refers. Two theories have predominated in the history of interpretation: either 1) it refers to a directly received prophetic revelation, whether to Paul or to another Christian prophet; or 2) it refers to a teaching of Jesus received as tradition, whether preserved in the Gospel tradition or otherwise unknown. This book investigates this problem from three angles: epistemological analysis, examining Paul's authorities for his knowledge, particularly in his eschatology; linguistic analysis, including both grammatical and lexical study of the phrase; and contextual analysis, setting the statement within its historical and literary contexts. These approaches converge to suggest a fresh solution to the problem: while Paul does appear to employ traditional Christian eschatological teaching in his response to the Thessalonian crisis (4:16-17a), the phrase logos kuriou does not refer to this tradition, but rather refers to the proclaimed gospel message about Jesus centred on his death and resurrection which forms the theological foundation of Paul's response (cf. 4:14).

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Discerning the "word of the Lord" by Pahl, Michael W. ©2009
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