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Daring, disreputable, and devout [electronic resource] : interpreting the Bible's women in the arts and music / Dan W. Clanton, Jr.

By: Clanton, Dan W.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : T & T Clark International, 2009Description: 1 online resource (x, 198 p.).ISBN: 9780567502551 (electronic bk.); 0567502554 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Women in the Bible | Bible. Old Testament -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Arts in the Bible | Music in the Bible | Religion | RELIGION -- Biblical Biography -- Old Testament | Apokryphen (Altes Testament) | Altes Testament | Motiv (Film) | Motiv (Kunst) | Motiv (Literatur) | Motiv (Musik) | FrauGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Daring, disreputable, and devout.DDC classification: 221.9/22082 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Introduction -- "A hard headed woman?" : Eve in the Hebrew Bible and later interpretations -- "Two fires burning" : Sarah and Hagar and the history of interpretation -- Trollops and temptresses : Delilahs in Judges, Camille Saint-Sa�ens' Samson et Dalila, and twentieth-century popular music -- "Gee, baby, ain't I good to you?" : unreturned and empty love in the book of Ruth -- "If I perish, I perish" : Esthers in film -- "Judy in disguise" : D.W. Griffith's Judith of Bethulia -- "Susie-Q, baby, I love you" : Susanna and art in the Renaissance -- Why we should care about the history of interpretation.
Summary: Stories of women in the Bible have been interpreted by artists, writers, musicians, filmmakers, and biblical commentators for centuries. However, in many cases, these later interpreters have often adapted and altered the Bible to fit their own view(s) of the stories. Ironically, these later renderings usually serve as the basis for the generally accepted view(s) of biblical women. For example, many readers of the Bible assume that Eve is to blame for the disobedient act in the Garden of Eden, or that Delilah seduced Samson and then cut his hair. A closer look at these assumptions, though, reveals that they are not based on the Bible, but are mediated through the creations of later interpreters. In this book, the author examines eight such women's stories, and shows how later readers interact with the biblical stories to construct sometimes fanciful, sometimes faulty views of these women. Dan Clanton, Jr. broadens our awareness of the influence of these later readings on how we understand biblical women so that we can be more critical in our engagement with them, and become more familiar with what the Bible actually says about the women whose stories it contains.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-190) and index.

Introduction -- "A hard headed woman?" : Eve in the Hebrew Bible and later interpretations -- "Two fires burning" : Sarah and Hagar and the history of interpretation -- Trollops and temptresses : Delilahs in Judges, Camille Saint-Sa�ens' Samson et Dalila, and twentieth-century popular music -- "Gee, baby, ain't I good to you?" : unreturned and empty love in the book of Ruth -- "If I perish, I perish" : Esthers in film -- "Judy in disguise" : D.W. Griffith's Judith of Bethulia -- "Susie-Q, baby, I love you" : Susanna and art in the Renaissance -- Why we should care about the history of interpretation.

Description based on print version record.

Stories of women in the Bible have been interpreted by artists, writers, musicians, filmmakers, and biblical commentators for centuries. However, in many cases, these later interpreters have often adapted and altered the Bible to fit their own view(s) of the stories. Ironically, these later renderings usually serve as the basis for the generally accepted view(s) of biblical women. For example, many readers of the Bible assume that Eve is to blame for the disobedient act in the Garden of Eden, or that Delilah seduced Samson and then cut his hair. A closer look at these assumptions, though, reveals that they are not based on the Bible, but are mediated through the creations of later interpreters. In this book, the author examines eight such women's stories, and shows how later readers interact with the biblical stories to construct sometimes fanciful, sometimes faulty views of these women. Dan Clanton, Jr. broadens our awareness of the influence of these later readings on how we understand biblical women so that we can be more critical in our engagement with them, and become more familiar with what the Bible actually says about the women whose stories it contains.

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Daring, disreputable, and devout by Clanton, Dan W. ©2009
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