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Like a bride adorned [electronic resource] : reading metaphor in John's Apocalypse / Lynn R. Huber.

By: Huber, Lynn R.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Emory studies in early Christianity: vol. 10.Publisher: New York : T & T Clark International, c2007Description: 1 online resource (ix, 221 p.).ISBN: 9780567349576 (electronic bk.); 0567349578 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Bible. Revelation -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Jerusalem in the Bible | Metaphor in the Bible | Bible. N.T. Revelation -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Religion | RELIGION -- Biblical Studies -- New Testament | Openbaring van Johannes (bijbelboek) | Bruiloft | Metaforen | Johannes-Apokalypse | MetapherGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Like a bride adorned.DDC classification: 228/.06 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Reading through the "veil of obscurity" : interpreting Revelation's imagistic language -- Knowing is seeing : ancient, medieval, and modern theories of metaphor -- Envisioning the city as a woman : a metaphorical framework in the Jewish literary traditions -- Unveiling the bride : nuptial traditions and Roman social discourse -- "Alleluia-- the wedding of the Lamb has come" : reading Revelation's nuptial imagery -- Conclusion : "like a bride adorned" : reading metaphor in Revelation -- Appendix : Babylon, a city without a bride : Revelation 18:23.
Summary: The phrase "like a bride adorned" is one of the ways Revelation describes the new Jerusalem which descends from heaven.� This phrase can also be read as describing one of the ways interpreters historically have understood the relationship between Revelation and its metaphorical language.� In contrast to views that suggest Revelation's metaphorical language is simple adornment, Huber argues that Revelation's persuasive power resides within the text's metaphorical nature and�she articulates a method for exploring how Revelation employs metaphor to shape an audience's thought. In o.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 191-215) and indexes.

Reading through the "veil of obscurity" : interpreting Revelation's imagistic language -- Knowing is seeing : ancient, medieval, and modern theories of metaphor -- Envisioning the city as a woman : a metaphorical framework in the Jewish literary traditions -- Unveiling the bride : nuptial traditions and Roman social discourse -- "Alleluia-- the wedding of the Lamb has come" : reading Revelation's nuptial imagery -- Conclusion : "like a bride adorned" : reading metaphor in Revelation -- Appendix : Babylon, a city without a bride : Revelation 18:23.

The phrase "like a bride adorned" is one of the ways Revelation describes the new Jerusalem which descends from heaven.� This phrase can also be read as describing one of the ways interpreters historically have understood the relationship between Revelation and its metaphorical language.� In contrast to views that suggest Revelation's metaphorical language is simple adornment, Huber argues that Revelation's persuasive power resides within the text's metaphorical nature and�she articulates a method for exploring how Revelation employs metaphor to shape an audience's thought. In o.

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Like a bride adorned by Huber, Lynn R. ©2007
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