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Making a Green Machine [electronic resource] : the Infrastructure of Beverage Container Recycling.

By: J�rgensen, Finn Arne.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Piscataway : Rutgers University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (205 p.).ISBN: 9780813550879 (electronic bk.); 0813550874 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Beverage containers -- Recycling -- Scandinavia | Beverage containers -- Recycling -- United States | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING -- Environmental -- Waste ManagementGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 363.72/88 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Figures; Preface; Chapter 1:Bottles, Cans, and Everyday Environmentalism; Chapter 2:The Problem of Bottles; Chapter 3:Creating Bottle Infrastructures; Chapter 4:A World of Bottles; Chapter 5:Can Cultures; Chapter 6:Greening the RVM; Chapter 7: Making Disposables Environmentally Friendly; Chapter 8:Message in a Bottle; Notes; Bibliography; Index; About the Author.
Summary: Making a Green Machine examines the development of the Scandinavian beverage container deposit-refund system, which has the highest return rates in the world, from 1970 to present. Finn Arne Jorgensen's comparative framework charts the complex network of business and political actors involved in the development of the reverse vending machine (RVM) and bottle deposit legislation to better understand the different historical trajectories empty beverage containers have taken across markets, including the U.S. The RVM began simply as a tool for grocers who had to handle empty refillable glass bot.
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Making a Green Machine examines the development of the Scandinavian beverage container deposit-refund system, which has the highest return rates in the world, from 1970 to present. Finn Arne Jorgensen's comparative framework charts the complex network of business and political actors involved in the development of the reverse vending machine (RVM) and bottle deposit legislation to better understand the different historical trajectories empty beverage containers have taken across markets, including the U.S. The RVM began simply as a tool for grocers who had to handle empty refillable glass bot.

Figures; Preface; Chapter 1:Bottles, Cans, and Everyday Environmentalism; Chapter 2:The Problem of Bottles; Chapter 3:Creating Bottle Infrastructures; Chapter 4:A World of Bottles; Chapter 5:Can Cultures; Chapter 6:Greening the RVM; Chapter 7: Making Disposables Environmentally Friendly; Chapter 8:Message in a Bottle; Notes; Bibliography; Index; About the Author.

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