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Broken glass [electronic resource] : Caleb Cushing & the shattering of the Union / John M. Belohlavek.

By: Belohlavek, John M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Civil War in the North: Publisher: Kent, Ohio : Kent State University Press, c2005Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 482 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9781612774473 (electronic bk.); 1612774474 (electronic bk.); 9781612774466 (electronic bk.); 1612774466 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Cushing, Caleb, 1800-1879 | Legislators -- United States -- Biography | United States. Congress. House -- Biography | Politicians -- Massachusetts -- Biography | Massachusetts -- Politics and government -- 1775-1865 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1815-1861 | Mexican War, 1846-1848 -- Biography | Diplomats -- United States -- Biography | Diplomats -- China -- Biography | Attorneys general -- United States -- Biography | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Historical | HISTORY / United States / 19th Century | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Broken glass.DDC classification: 973.5/092 | B Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
The view from High Street, 1800-1826 -- Foreign adventures and congressional ventures, 1827-1834 -- Whig star rising : the politics of antislavery, 1835-1837) -- Battling the British Lion and the American Fox, 1837-1840 -- Tyler and the Corporal's Guard, 1841-1843 -- The road to China, 1843-1844 -- The warrior of Manifest Destiny, 1845-1848 -- The doughface Democrat, 1848-1853 -- The powerbroker : attorney general, 1853-1857 -- The most unpopular man in New England, 1857-1861 -- From Massachusetts exile to Washington insider, 1861-1869 -- The diplomat reemerges, 1869-1879.
Summary: The most hated man in New England, as critics dubbed him on the eve of the Civil War, Caleb Cushing, brash and controversial, was perhaps the last of 19th-century America's renaissance figures. Poet and politician, essayist and diplomat, general and lawyer, this multidimensional scion of a Newburyport, Massachusetts, mercantile family moved in and out of positions of power and influence for more than fifty years. First as a spokesman for the Whig and then the Democratic Parties, Cushing served in Congress, as the minister to China, as a general in the Mexican War, as U.S. attorney general, and as a legal adviser and diplomatic operative for Presidents Lincoln, Johnson, and Grant. With an unharnessed mind and probing intellect, Cushing inspired and infuriated contemporaries with his strident views on such topics as race relations and gender roles, national expansion and the legitimacy of secession. While his positions generated arguments and garnered enemies, his views often mirrored those of many Americans. His abilities and talents sustained him in public service and made him one of the most outstanding and fascinating figures of the era. Biographer John Belohlavek delivers a work of importance and originality to specialists in the areas of mid-nineteenth-century political, legal, and diplomatic history as well as to those interested in New England history, antebellum gender relations, civil-military relations, and Mexican War studies.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 459-472) and index.

The view from High Street, 1800-1826 -- Foreign adventures and congressional ventures, 1827-1834 -- Whig star rising : the politics of antislavery, 1835-1837) -- Battling the British Lion and the American Fox, 1837-1840 -- Tyler and the Corporal's Guard, 1841-1843 -- The road to China, 1843-1844 -- The warrior of Manifest Destiny, 1845-1848 -- The doughface Democrat, 1848-1853 -- The powerbroker : attorney general, 1853-1857 -- The most unpopular man in New England, 1857-1861 -- From Massachusetts exile to Washington insider, 1861-1869 -- The diplomat reemerges, 1869-1879.

Description based on print version record.

The most hated man in New England, as critics dubbed him on the eve of the Civil War, Caleb Cushing, brash and controversial, was perhaps the last of 19th-century America's renaissance figures. Poet and politician, essayist and diplomat, general and lawyer, this multidimensional scion of a Newburyport, Massachusetts, mercantile family moved in and out of positions of power and influence for more than fifty years. First as a spokesman for the Whig and then the Democratic Parties, Cushing served in Congress, as the minister to China, as a general in the Mexican War, as U.S. attorney general, and as a legal adviser and diplomatic operative for Presidents Lincoln, Johnson, and Grant. With an unharnessed mind and probing intellect, Cushing inspired and infuriated contemporaries with his strident views on such topics as race relations and gender roles, national expansion and the legitimacy of secession. While his positions generated arguments and garnered enemies, his views often mirrored those of many Americans. His abilities and talents sustained him in public service and made him one of the most outstanding and fascinating figures of the era. Biographer John Belohlavek delivers a work of importance and originality to specialists in the areas of mid-nineteenth-century political, legal, and diplomatic history as well as to those interested in New England history, antebellum gender relations, civil-military relations, and Mexican War studies.

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Other editions of this work

Broken glass by Belohlavek, John M. ©2005
Broken glass by Belohlavek, John M. ©2005
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