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Imaginary friends [electronic resource] : representing Quakers in American culture, 1650-1950 / James Emmett Ryan.

By: Ryan, James Emmett.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in American thought and culture: Publisher: Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, c2009Description: 1 online resource (xii, 285 p.).ISBN: 9780299231736 (e-book); 0299231739 (e-book).Subject(s): Quakers -- United States | Quakers -- United States -- History | RELIGION -- Christianity -- Quaker | Qu�aker | USAGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Imaginary friends.DDC classification: 289.6/73 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: National identity, representation, and genre -- 1: Quaker religion in colonial New England -- 2: Political theory and Quaker community in the early republic -- 3: Chronicles of friendship: Quaker historiography in the early republic -- 4: Quaker biography in transatlantic context -- 5: Representing Quakers in American fiction -- 6: Staging Quakerism: theater and cinema -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Works cited -- Index.
Summary: From the Publisher: When Americans today think of the Religious Society of Friends, better known as Quakers, they may picture the smiling figure on boxes of oatmeal. But since their arrival in the American colonies in the 1650s, Quakers' spiritual values and social habits have set them apart from other Americans. And their example-whether real or imagined-has served as a religious conscience for an expanding nation. Portrayals of Quakers-from dangerous and anarchic figures in seventeenth-century theological debates to moral exemplars in twentieth-century theater and film (Grace Kelly in High Noon, for example)-reflected attempts by writers, speechmakers, and dramatists to grapple with the troubling social issues of the day. As foils to more widely held religious, political, and moral values, members of the Society of Friends became touchstones in national discussions about pacifism, abolition, gender equality, consumer culture, and modernity. Spanning four centuries, Imaginary Friends takes readers through the shifting representations of Quaker life in a wide range of literary and visual genres, from theological debates, missionary work records, political theory, and biography to fiction, poetry, theater, and film. It illustrates the ways that, during the long history of Quakerism in the United States, these "imaginary" Friends have offered a radical model of morality, piety, and anti-modernity against which the evolving culture has measured itself.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-271) and index.

Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: National identity, representation, and genre -- 1: Quaker religion in colonial New England -- 2: Political theory and Quaker community in the early republic -- 3: Chronicles of friendship: Quaker historiography in the early republic -- 4: Quaker biography in transatlantic context -- 5: Representing Quakers in American fiction -- 6: Staging Quakerism: theater and cinema -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Works cited -- Index.

From the Publisher: When Americans today think of the Religious Society of Friends, better known as Quakers, they may picture the smiling figure on boxes of oatmeal. But since their arrival in the American colonies in the 1650s, Quakers' spiritual values and social habits have set them apart from other Americans. And their example-whether real or imagined-has served as a religious conscience for an expanding nation. Portrayals of Quakers-from dangerous and anarchic figures in seventeenth-century theological debates to moral exemplars in twentieth-century theater and film (Grace Kelly in High Noon, for example)-reflected attempts by writers, speechmakers, and dramatists to grapple with the troubling social issues of the day. As foils to more widely held religious, political, and moral values, members of the Society of Friends became touchstones in national discussions about pacifism, abolition, gender equality, consumer culture, and modernity. Spanning four centuries, Imaginary Friends takes readers through the shifting representations of Quaker life in a wide range of literary and visual genres, from theological debates, missionary work records, political theory, and biography to fiction, poetry, theater, and film. It illustrates the ways that, during the long history of Quakerism in the United States, these "imaginary" Friends have offered a radical model of morality, piety, and anti-modernity against which the evolving culture has measured itself.

Description based on print version record.

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Imaginary friends by Ryan, James Emmett. ©2009
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