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Marriage or celibacy? [electronic resource] : the Daily telegraph on a Victorian dilemma / John M. Robson.

By: Robson, John M.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c1995Description: 1 online resource (365 p.).ISBN: 9781442677081 (electronic bk.); 1442677082 (electronic bk.).Uniform titles: Daily telegraph (London, England : 1856) Subject(s): Daily telegraph (London, England : 1856) | Letters to the editor -- England | Prostitution -- Press coverage | Marriage -- Press coverage | Emigration and immigration -- Press coverage | Middle class -- England -- Attitudes -- History -- 19th century | England -- Moral conditions | Celibato -- Noticias period�isticas -- Gran Breta�na | Prostituci�on -- Noticias period�isticas -- Gran Breta�na | Clase media -- Gran Breta�na -- Actitudes -- Historia -- Siglo XIX | Cartas al editor -- Noticias period�isticas -- Gran Breta�na | Emigraci�on e inmigraci�on -- Noticias period�isticas -- Gran Breta�na | Gran Breta�na -- Condiciones morales -- Siglo XIX | Courrier des lecteurs -- Angleterre | Mariage -- Opinion publique | Classes moyennes -- Angleterre -- Attitudes -- Histoire -- 19e si�ecle | Angleterre -- Conditions morales | Huwelijk | Celibaat | Berichtgeving | The Daily Telegraph (krant) | Daily telegraph | Ehe | Umfrage | Geschichte 1868 | LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / JournalismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Marriage or celibacy?DDC classification: 070.4/4930681/0942 Other classification: 05.33 | 15.70 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
1. The Great Social Evil -- 2. Marriage or Celibacy? The Daily Telegraph Series -- 3. Marriage and Mores: Arguments and Practices -- 4. "The Equation of Income and Expenditure" -- 5. Celibates and Celibacy -- 6. Problems and Solutions: The Ways In and the Way Out -- 7. Emigration or Starvation? -- 8. Conclusions -- Appendix C: Comparison of the Expenditures in "Marriage or Celibacy?" and Other Sources.
Summary: Public attention was first caught by a court report of a failed attempt to entrap a Belgian girl into prostitution. This induced blistering editorial comment and angry letters to the paper deploring ineffectual controls over the "Great Social Evil." The next development was unusual for the Victorian press: readers began to write extensive and richly varied comment on the root of the problem - young people did not have in possession or expectation enough money or the right qualifications for marriage. The Telegraph initiated a new form of popular journalism by filling its correspondence columns for almost a month with readers letters under the heading "Marriage or Celibacy?", which they supplemented with lengthy leading articles.Summary: John Robson places in contemporary context the central issues facing Victorian youth: What is a proper marriage? How to balance income and expenditure? What are the ideal qualities of young women and men? "Emigration or starvation?" In examining these debates, he looks closely into methods of argument, connecting rhetorical techniques with public persuasion. The letters being a special kind of discourse, he shows how in the debates rhetorical and logical arguments are specifically designed to persuade the Telegraph's readers. Marriage or Celibacy? contributes to our knowledge of Victorian manners and mores, particularly among the lower middle class, and is a telling episode in the history of popular journalism.Summary: In July 1868 the Daily Telegraph congratulated itself on providing the arena for a controversy marked by "good sense, liveliness, practical wisdom, and hearty humanity." The controversy was over the choice - "Marriage or Celibacy?"--Faced by middle-class youth trying to reconcile economic facts with moral values, social customs - and love. The arena was the correspondence page of a newspaper just establishing itself as the most successful London daily through its appeal to the middle-class reader.
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Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

1. The Great Social Evil -- 2. Marriage or Celibacy? The Daily Telegraph Series -- 3. Marriage and Mores: Arguments and Practices -- 4. "The Equation of Income and Expenditure" -- 5. Celibates and Celibacy -- 6. Problems and Solutions: The Ways In and the Way Out -- 7. Emigration or Starvation? -- 8. Conclusions -- Appendix C: Comparison of the Expenditures in "Marriage or Celibacy?" and Other Sources.

Public attention was first caught by a court report of a failed attempt to entrap a Belgian girl into prostitution. This induced blistering editorial comment and angry letters to the paper deploring ineffectual controls over the "Great Social Evil." The next development was unusual for the Victorian press: readers began to write extensive and richly varied comment on the root of the problem - young people did not have in possession or expectation enough money or the right qualifications for marriage. The Telegraph initiated a new form of popular journalism by filling its correspondence columns for almost a month with readers letters under the heading "Marriage or Celibacy?", which they supplemented with lengthy leading articles.

John Robson places in contemporary context the central issues facing Victorian youth: What is a proper marriage? How to balance income and expenditure? What are the ideal qualities of young women and men? "Emigration or starvation?" In examining these debates, he looks closely into methods of argument, connecting rhetorical techniques with public persuasion. The letters being a special kind of discourse, he shows how in the debates rhetorical and logical arguments are specifically designed to persuade the Telegraph's readers. Marriage or Celibacy? contributes to our knowledge of Victorian manners and mores, particularly among the lower middle class, and is a telling episode in the history of popular journalism.

In July 1868 the Daily Telegraph congratulated itself on providing the arena for a controversy marked by "good sense, liveliness, practical wisdom, and hearty humanity." The controversy was over the choice - "Marriage or Celibacy?"--Faced by middle-class youth trying to reconcile economic facts with moral values, social customs - and love. The arena was the correspondence page of a newspaper just establishing itself as the most successful London daily through its appeal to the middle-class reader.

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Other editions of this work

Marriage or celibacy? by Robson, John M. ©1995
Marriage or celibacy? by Robson, John M. ©1995
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