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Hard-boiled fiction and dark romanticism [electronic resource] / Jopi Nyman.

By: Nyman, Jopi, 1966-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studien zur englischen und amerikanischen Literatur: Bd. 19.Publisher: Frankfurt am Main ; New York : Peter Lang, c1998Description: 1 online resource (144 p.).ISBN: 9783653019261 (electronic bk.); 3653019265 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): American fiction -- Male authors -- History and criticism | Masculinity in literature | Detective and mystery stories, American -- History and criticism | Noir fiction, American -- History and criticism | Cain, James M. (James Mallahan), 1892-1977 -- Criticism and interpretation | Hemingway, Ernest, 1899-1961 -- Criticism and interpretation | Hammett, Dashiell, 1894-1961 -- Criticism and interpretation | McCoy, Horace, 1897-1955 -- Criticism and interpretation | American fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Romanticism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Men in literature | LITERARY CRITICISM / American / GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Hard-boiled fiction and dark romanticism.DDC classification: 813/.5209145 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Introduction -- Hard-Boiled Fiction and the Romantic Tradition -- Waste Lands -- Landscapes of Terror -- Romance Subverted -- Conclusion.
Summary: Since the 1920s the use of romantic features in the tough masculinist narratives of American hard-boiled fiction has often surprised its readers. Through an exploration of fiction written by four major hard-boiled writers (Ernest Hemingway, Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain and Horace McCoy), this study explains the genre's fascination with romance from a critical Cultural Studies perspective. It focuses not only on the use of the theme of the waste land and Gothic conventions, but also on the subversion of romance and its ideal hero. The study argues that the romanticism and pathos evident in the genre are antimodern and nostalgic yearnings for a lost world of true individualism and manhood.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 137-144).

1. Introduction -- 2. Hard-Boiled Fiction and the Romantic Tradition -- 3. Waste Lands -- 4. Landscapes of Terror -- 5. Romance Subverted -- 6. Conclusion.

Since the 1920s the use of romantic features in the tough masculinist narratives of American hard-boiled fiction has often surprised its readers. Through an exploration of fiction written by four major hard-boiled writers (Ernest Hemingway, Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain and Horace McCoy), this study explains the genre's fascination with romance from a critical Cultural Studies perspective. It focuses not only on the use of the theme of the waste land and Gothic conventions, but also on the subversion of romance and its ideal hero. The study argues that the romanticism and pathos evident in the genre are antimodern and nostalgic yearnings for a lost world of true individualism and manhood.

Description based on print version record.

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Hard-boiled fiction and dark romanticism by Nyman, Jopi, ©1998
Hard-boiled fiction and dark romanticism by Nyman, Jopi, ©1998
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