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Aftermath of war [electronic resource] : Americans and the remaking of Japan, 1945-1952 / Howard B. Schonberger.

By: Schonberger, Howard B.
Material type: TextTextSeries: American diplomatic history: Publisher: Kent, Ohio : Kent State University Press, c1989Description: 1 online resource (xi, 347 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9781612770253 (electronic bk.); 1612770258 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Japan -- History -- Allied occupation, 1945-1952 | United States -- Foreign relations -- Japan | Japan -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Officials and employees -- Biography | Japan -- Foreign relations -- 1945- | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1953 | Geallieerden | Bezettingen | Wederopbouw | Buitenlandse betrekkingen | Besatzungspolitik | Besetzung | USA | Japan | POLITICAL SCIENCE / Government / International | POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / General | HISTORY / Military / World War IIGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Aftermath of war.DDC classification: 327.73052 Other classification: 15.75 | 3,6 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Joseph C. Grew: The emperor of Japan and planning the occupation -- Douglas MacArthur: The peacemaker and the presidency -- T. A. Bisson: The limits of reform in occupied Japan -- James S. Killen: American labor's Cold War in occupied Japan -- Harry F. Kern: The Japan lobby in American diplomacy -- William H. Draper, Jr.: The eightieth congress and the origins of Japan's "reverse course" -- Joseph M. Dodge: The integration of Japan into the world economy -- John Foster Dulles: American bases, rearmament, and the China questions in the making of the Japanese peace treaty.
Summary: With the fighting in World War II over in mid-August 1945, more than one-half million American troops moved to occupy Japan. Much of the country was ruined, buried under the rubble and debris of saturation bombing and the atomic blasts over Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Japan's rulers were stunned by defeat, and its people resigned to whatever the victors might impose upon them. Aftermath of War described the American transformation of Occupied Japan to be the greatest success story of United States policy in Asian. Howard Schonberger argues that this success came at a high price. Many of the popularity supported democratic reforms promoted by Americans in the early years of the Occupation were scuttled. Asian peoples developed a fear of the new Japan as a junior partner of the United States in opposing their legitimate revolutionary aspirations. Finally Japanese exports have triggered a dangerous xenophobic reaction in the United States in recent years. Schonberger recounts the rise of the new Japan through the eyes of eight Americans centrally engaged in events of the Occupation. Aftermath o War provides insights into the recent conflicts between the U.S. and Japan and recaptures the ideological debate within the United States over the future course of Japan. It implicitly suggests that Americans and Japanese seriously reconsider the post-surrender reform agenda rejected by official American policy after 1947.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [325]-335) and index.

Joseph C. Grew: The emperor of Japan and planning the occupation -- Douglas MacArthur: The peacemaker and the presidency -- T. A. Bisson: The limits of reform in occupied Japan -- James S. Killen: American labor's Cold War in occupied Japan -- Harry F. Kern: The Japan lobby in American diplomacy -- William H. Draper, Jr.: The eightieth congress and the origins of Japan's "reverse course" -- Joseph M. Dodge: The integration of Japan into the world economy -- John Foster Dulles: American bases, rearmament, and the China questions in the making of the Japanese peace treaty.

Description based on print version record.

With the fighting in World War II over in mid-August 1945, more than one-half million American troops moved to occupy Japan. Much of the country was ruined, buried under the rubble and debris of saturation bombing and the atomic blasts over Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Japan's rulers were stunned by defeat, and its people resigned to whatever the victors might impose upon them. Aftermath of War described the American transformation of Occupied Japan to be the greatest success story of United States policy in Asian. Howard Schonberger argues that this success came at a high price. Many of the popularity supported democratic reforms promoted by Americans in the early years of the Occupation were scuttled. Asian peoples developed a fear of the new Japan as a junior partner of the United States in opposing their legitimate revolutionary aspirations. Finally Japanese exports have triggered a dangerous xenophobic reaction in the United States in recent years. Schonberger recounts the rise of the new Japan through the eyes of eight Americans centrally engaged in events of the Occupation. Aftermath o War provides insights into the recent conflicts between the U.S. and Japan and recaptures the ideological debate within the United States over the future course of Japan. It implicitly suggests that Americans and Japanese seriously reconsider the post-surrender reform agenda rejected by official American policy after 1947.

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Other editions of this work

Aftermath of war by Schonberger, Howard B. ©1989
Aftermath of war by Schonberger, Howard B. ©1989
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