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Weaving the past [electronic resource] : a history of Latin America's indigenous women from the prehispanic period to the present / Susan Kellogg.

By: Kellogg, Susan.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, c2005Description: 1 online resource (x, 338 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 9780198040422 (electronic bk.); 0198040423 (electronic bk.); 1423733754 (electronic bk.); 9781423733751 (electronic bk.); 0195123816 (alk. paper); 9780195123814 (alk. paper); 0195183282 (hbk. : alk. paper); 9780195183283 (hbk. : alk. paper); 1280471530; 9781280471537.Subject(s): Indian women -- Latin America -- History | Indian women -- Latin America -- Social conditions | Indian women -- Latin America -- Politics and government | Latin America -- History | Latin America -- Social conditions | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Women's Studies | Electronic books | Indianerin | Sozialgeschichte | LateinamerikaGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Weaving the past.DDC classification: 305.48/898 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Introducing the indigenous women of Latin America. Some introductory remarks ; Some useful concepts ; Some background on Latin America's earliest women -- Of warriors and working women: gender in later prehispanic Mesoamerica and the Andes. Women and gender among northern and central Mexican peoples: parallel organizations, hierarchical ideologies ; The postclassic �Nudzahui: elite gender complementarity ; The Maya of the classic and postclassic periods: the flexible patriarchy ; The Andes: women and supernatural and state power ; Conclusion -- Colliding worlds: indigenous women, conquest, and colonialism. Gender, sex, and violence in the conquest era ; Laboring women: paying tribute, losing authority ; Family and religious life: the paradoxes of purity and enclosure ; A rebellious spirit ; Conclusion -- With muted voices: Mesoamerica's twentieth- and twenty-first century women. Nahua women: complementarity within submissiveness ; Oaxaca: land of the "matriarchs"? ; Maya women: working, weaving, changing ; Conclusion -- Fighting for survival through political action and cultural creativity: indigenous women in contemporary South and Central America. Women in the Andes: revolutionizing tradition in the highland cultures of Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia ; Women in the tropical lowlands of South America: egalitarian political structures, female subordination, and the fight for cultural survival ; Indigenous women in Central America: searching for empowerment in diverse circumstances ; Conclusion -- Indigenous women: creating agendas for change -- Organizations mentioned in the text and their acronyms.
Summary: "Weaving the Past" offers a comprehensive and interdisciplinary history of Latin America's indigenous women. While the book concentrates on native women in Mesoamerica and the Andes, it covers indigenous people in other parts of South and Central America, including lowland peoples in and beyond Brazil, and Afro-indigenous peoples, such as the Garifuna, of Central America. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, it argues that change, not continuity, has been the norm for indigenous peoples whose resilience in the face of complex and long-term patterns of cultural change is due in no small part to the roles, actions, and agency of women. The book provides broad coverage of gender roles in native Latin America over many centuries, drawing upon a range of evidence from archaeology, anthropology, religion, and politics. Primary and secondary sources include chronicles, codices, newspaper articles, and monographic work on specific regions.; Arguing that Latin America's indigenous women were the critical force behind the more important events and processes of Latin America's history, Kellogg interweaves the region's history of family, sexual, and labour history with the origins of women's power in prehispanic, colonial, and modern South and Central America. Shying away from interpretations that treat women as house bound and passive, the book instead emphasizes women's long history of performing labour, being politically active, and contributing to, even supporting, family and community well-being.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 239-315) and index.

Description based on print version record.

Introducing the indigenous women of Latin America. Some introductory remarks ; Some useful concepts ; Some background on Latin America's earliest women -- Of warriors and working women: gender in later prehispanic Mesoamerica and the Andes. Women and gender among northern and central Mexican peoples: parallel organizations, hierarchical ideologies ; The postclassic �Nudzahui: elite gender complementarity ; The Maya of the classic and postclassic periods: the flexible patriarchy ; The Andes: women and supernatural and state power ; Conclusion -- Colliding worlds: indigenous women, conquest, and colonialism. Gender, sex, and violence in the conquest era ; Laboring women: paying tribute, losing authority ; Family and religious life: the paradoxes of purity and enclosure ; A rebellious spirit ; Conclusion -- With muted voices: Mesoamerica's twentieth- and twenty-first century women. Nahua women: complementarity within submissiveness ; Oaxaca: land of the "matriarchs"? ; Maya women: working, weaving, changing ; Conclusion -- Fighting for survival through political action and cultural creativity: indigenous women in contemporary South and Central America. Women in the Andes: revolutionizing tradition in the highland cultures of Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia ; Women in the tropical lowlands of South America: egalitarian political structures, female subordination, and the fight for cultural survival ; Indigenous women in Central America: searching for empowerment in diverse circumstances ; Conclusion -- Indigenous women: creating agendas for change -- Organizations mentioned in the text and their acronyms.

"Weaving the Past" offers a comprehensive and interdisciplinary history of Latin America's indigenous women. While the book concentrates on native women in Mesoamerica and the Andes, it covers indigenous people in other parts of South and Central America, including lowland peoples in and beyond Brazil, and Afro-indigenous peoples, such as the Garifuna, of Central America. Drawing on primary and secondary sources, it argues that change, not continuity, has been the norm for indigenous peoples whose resilience in the face of complex and long-term patterns of cultural change is due in no small part to the roles, actions, and agency of women. The book provides broad coverage of gender roles in native Latin America over many centuries, drawing upon a range of evidence from archaeology, anthropology, religion, and politics. Primary and secondary sources include chronicles, codices, newspaper articles, and monographic work on specific regions.; Arguing that Latin America's indigenous women were the critical force behind the more important events and processes of Latin America's history, Kellogg interweaves the region's history of family, sexual, and labour history with the origins of women's power in prehispanic, colonial, and modern South and Central America. Shying away from interpretations that treat women as house bound and passive, the book instead emphasizes women's long history of performing labour, being politically active, and contributing to, even supporting, family and community well-being.

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Other editions of this work

Weaving the past by Kellogg, Susan. ©2005
Weaving the past by Kellogg, Susan. ©2005
Weaving the past by Kellogg, Susan. ©2005
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