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Building the invisible orphanage [electronic resource] : a prehistory of the American welfare system / Matthew A. Crenson.

By: Crenson, Matthew A, 1943-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1998Description: 1 online resource (xii, 383 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780674029996 (electronic bk.); 0674029992 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Public welfare -- United States -- History | United States -- Social policy | Child welfare -- United States -- History | Welfare state | Orphanages -- United States -- History | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Public Policy -- Social Services & Welfare | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Public Policy -- Social Security | Weeshuizen | Jeugdhulpverlening | Welzijnszorg | Kinderf�ursorge | Waisenhaus | Geschichte | F�ursorge | USA | Geschichte 1880-1996Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Building the invisible orphanage.DDC classification: 362.7/0973 Other classification: 15.85 | 79.16 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
1. The Decline of the Orphanage and the Invention of Welfare -- 2. The Institutional Inclination -- 3. Two Dimensions of Institutional Change -- 4. Institutional Self-Doubt and Internal Reform -- 5. From Orphanage to Home -- 6. The Orphanage Reaches Outward -- 7. "The Unwalled Institution of the State" -- 8. The Perils of Placing Out -- 9. "The Experiment of Having No Home" -- 10. Mobilizing for Mothers' Pensions -- 11. Religious Wars -- Conclusion: An End to the Orphanage.
Summary: This book examines the connection between the decline of the orphanage and the rise of welfare. Matthew Crenson argues that the prehistory of the welfare system was played out not on the stage of national politics or class conflict but in the micropolitics of institutional management. New arrangements for child welfare policy emerged gradually as superintendents, visiting agents, and charity officials responded to the difficulties that they encountered in running orphanages or creating systems that served as alternatives to institutional care. Crenson also follows the decades-long debate about the relative merits of family care or institutional care for dependent children. Leaving poor children at home with their mothers emerged as the most generally acceptable alternative to the orphanage, along with an ambitious new conception of social reform. Instead of sheltering vulnerable children in institutions designed to transform them into virtuous citizens, the reformers of the Progressive Era tried to integrate poor children into the larger society, while protecting them from its perils.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 333-374) and index.

1. The Decline of the Orphanage and the Invention of Welfare -- 2. The Institutional Inclination -- 3. Two Dimensions of Institutional Change -- 4. Institutional Self-Doubt and Internal Reform -- 5. From Orphanage to Home -- 6. The Orphanage Reaches Outward -- 7. "The Unwalled Institution of the State" -- 8. The Perils of Placing Out -- 9. "The Experiment of Having No Home" -- 10. Mobilizing for Mothers' Pensions -- 11. Religious Wars -- Conclusion: An End to the Orphanage.

This book examines the connection between the decline of the orphanage and the rise of welfare. Matthew Crenson argues that the prehistory of the welfare system was played out not on the stage of national politics or class conflict but in the micropolitics of institutional management. New arrangements for child welfare policy emerged gradually as superintendents, visiting agents, and charity officials responded to the difficulties that they encountered in running orphanages or creating systems that served as alternatives to institutional care. Crenson also follows the decades-long debate about the relative merits of family care or institutional care for dependent children. Leaving poor children at home with their mothers emerged as the most generally acceptable alternative to the orphanage, along with an ambitious new conception of social reform. Instead of sheltering vulnerable children in institutions designed to transform them into virtuous citizens, the reformers of the Progressive Era tried to integrate poor children into the larger society, while protecting them from its perils.

Description based on print version record.

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Building the invisible orphanage by Crenson, Matthew A., ©1998
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