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The elusiveness of the ordinary [electronic resource] : studies in the possibility of philosophy / Stanley Rosen.

By: Rosen, Stanley, 1929-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, c2002Description: 1 online resource (viii, 327 p.).ISBN: 0300091974 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780300091977 (hardcover : alk. paper); 9780300129526 (electronic bk.); 0300129521 (electronic bk.); 1281730335; 9781281730336.Subject(s): Ordinary-language philosophy | Electronic books | Philosophie du langage ordinaire | PHILOSOPHY -- Movements -- Post-Structuralism | Spreektaal | Gezond verstandGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Elusiveness of the ordinary.DDC classification: 149/.94 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
Politics and nature in Montesquieu -- Husserl's conception of the life-world -- Kant and Heidegger: transcendental alternatives to Aristotle -- Wittgenstein, Strauss, and the possibility of philosophy -- Moore on common sense -- Austin and ordinary language -- What do we talk about? -- The attributes of ordinary experience -- Concluding remarks.
Summary: The concept of the ordinary, along with such cognates as everyday life, ordinary language and ordinary experience, has come into special prominence in late-modern philosophy. Thinkers have employed two opposing yet related responses to the notion of the ordinary: scientific and phenomenological approaches on the one hand, and on the other, more informal or even anti-scientific procedures. Philosopher Stanley Rosen here presents a comprehensive study of the main approaches to theoretical mastery of ordinary experience. He evaluates the responses of a wide range of modern and contemporary thinkers and grapples with the peculiar problem of the ordinary - how to define it in its own terms without transforming it into a technical - and so, extraordinary - artefact. Rosen's approach is both historical and philosophical. He offers Montesquieu and Husserl as examples of the scientific approach to ordinary experience; contrasts Kant and Heidegger with Aristotle to illustrate the transcendental approach and its main alternatives; discusses attempts by Wittgenstein and Strauss to return to the pre-theoretical domain; and analyzes the differences among such thinkers as Moore, Austin, Grice and Russell with respect to the analytical response to ordinary language. Rosen concludes with a theoretical exploration of the central problem of how to capture the elusive ordinary intact.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Politics and nature in Montesquieu -- Husserl's conception of the life-world -- Kant and Heidegger: transcendental alternatives to Aristotle -- Wittgenstein, Strauss, and the possibility of philosophy -- Moore on common sense -- Austin and ordinary language -- What do we talk about? -- The attributes of ordinary experience -- Concluding remarks.

Description based on print version record.

The concept of the ordinary, along with such cognates as everyday life, ordinary language and ordinary experience, has come into special prominence in late-modern philosophy. Thinkers have employed two opposing yet related responses to the notion of the ordinary: scientific and phenomenological approaches on the one hand, and on the other, more informal or even anti-scientific procedures. Philosopher Stanley Rosen here presents a comprehensive study of the main approaches to theoretical mastery of ordinary experience. He evaluates the responses of a wide range of modern and contemporary thinkers and grapples with the peculiar problem of the ordinary - how to define it in its own terms without transforming it into a technical - and so, extraordinary - artefact. Rosen's approach is both historical and philosophical. He offers Montesquieu and Husserl as examples of the scientific approach to ordinary experience; contrasts Kant and Heidegger with Aristotle to illustrate the transcendental approach and its main alternatives; discusses attempts by Wittgenstein and Strauss to return to the pre-theoretical domain; and analyzes the differences among such thinkers as Moore, Austin, Grice and Russell with respect to the analytical response to ordinary language. Rosen concludes with a theoretical exploration of the central problem of how to capture the elusive ordinary intact.

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The elusiveness of the ordinary by Rosen, Stanley, ©2002
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