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Priorities for GEOINT research at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency [electronic resource] / Committee on Basic and Applied Research Priorities in Geospatial Science for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, Mapping Science Committee, National Research Council of the National Academies.

Contributor(s): National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Basic and Applied Research Priorities in Geospatial Scince for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency | National Research Council (U.S.). Mapping Science Committee.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource ([114] p.).ISBN: 0309658624 (electronic bk.); 9780309658621 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): United States. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency | Intelligence service -- United States | Geographic information systems -- United States | TRUE CRIME -- Espionage | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Freedom & Security -- IntelligenceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Priorities for GEOINT research at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.DDC classification: 327.12/73 Online resources: EBSCOhost
Contents:
The evolving mission of NGA -- NGA challenges -- Hard problems and promising approaches -- The research infrastructure at NGA -- Priorities for NGA GEOINT research.
Summary: The mission of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is to provide timely, relevant, and accurate geospatial intelligence to support national security. NGA defines geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) as "the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and visually depict physical features and geographically referenced activities on the Earth." NGA faces a crisis of need in the post-9/11 world. Without effective GEOINT, the nation and its armed services are vulnerable to security risks and threats. NGA must improve the speed, rigor, accuracy, fidelity, and relevance of its geospatial analyses while the sources of data increase in number and type, and data volume grows. Because GEOINT is moving rapidly to ever-finer temporal, spatial, radiometric, and spectral resolutions, increased volumes and more complex data must be absorbed -- that is, captured, stored, analyzed, and reported. The time horizons of problems that the intelligence community seeks to understand have gone from months and days to hours and minutes. Other challenges include adopting and spearheading new methods and technologies while maintaining fully operational existing systems; integrating data from a host of old and new sources through rapid georectification and spatial analysis; improving uncertainty management, including dealing with denial and deception; dealing with data volume issues, especially the need to automate human interpretation tasks; ubiquity of access, including web-based systems and the effective reuse of existing data; and the ability to work effectively within a broadening pool of partners and allies while maintaining appropriate security control. The challenges can be summarized as the conversion of what today are 'data' into distilled 'information' and 'knowledge.' Yet analysis methods have not evolved to integrate multiple sources of data rapidly to create actionable intelligence. Nor do today's means of information dissemination, indexing, and preservation suit this new agenda or future needs. NGA will play a major role for the entire intelligence community in creating the next-generation National System for Geospatial Intelligence and has set forth a consistent vision of what this next-generation GEOINT should be. This vision is intended to see NGA through the transition into a new era. NGA also plays a leading role in supporting fundamental research for the next generation of GEOINT, termed GEOINT2 in this report. It is within this context that the National Academies was asked by NGA to identify research priorities and strategic directions in geospatial science for the NGA's Basic and Applied Research Program. The goal of the study was to examine both "hard problems" in geospatial science that must be addressed to improve geospatial intelligence, and promising methods and tools in geospatial science and related disciplines to pursue in order to resolve these problems. The results of this study are intended to help NGA's chief scientist to anticipate and prioritize geospatial science research directions and, by doing so, to enhance NGA's mix of research as it addresses these priorities.
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Includes bibliographical references.

The evolving mission of NGA -- NGA challenges -- Hard problems and promising approaches -- The research infrastructure at NGA -- Priorities for NGA GEOINT research.

The mission of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is to provide timely, relevant, and accurate geospatial intelligence to support national security. NGA defines geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) as "the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and visually depict physical features and geographically referenced activities on the Earth." NGA faces a crisis of need in the post-9/11 world. Without effective GEOINT, the nation and its armed services are vulnerable to security risks and threats. NGA must improve the speed, rigor, accuracy, fidelity, and relevance of its geospatial analyses while the sources of data increase in number and type, and data volume grows. Because GEOINT is moving rapidly to ever-finer temporal, spatial, radiometric, and spectral resolutions, increased volumes and more complex data must be absorbed -- that is, captured, stored, analyzed, and reported. The time horizons of problems that the intelligence community seeks to understand have gone from months and days to hours and minutes. Other challenges include adopting and spearheading new methods and technologies while maintaining fully operational existing systems; integrating data from a host of old and new sources through rapid georectification and spatial analysis; improving uncertainty management, including dealing with denial and deception; dealing with data volume issues, especially the need to automate human interpretation tasks; ubiquity of access, including web-based systems and the effective reuse of existing data; and the ability to work effectively within a broadening pool of partners and allies while maintaining appropriate security control. The challenges can be summarized as the conversion of what today are 'data' into distilled 'information' and 'knowledge.' Yet analysis methods have not evolved to integrate multiple sources of data rapidly to create actionable intelligence. Nor do today's means of information dissemination, indexing, and preservation suit this new agenda or future needs. NGA will play a major role for the entire intelligence community in creating the next-generation National System for Geospatial Intelligence and has set forth a consistent vision of what this next-generation GEOINT should be. This vision is intended to see NGA through the transition into a new era. NGA also plays a leading role in supporting fundamental research for the next generation of GEOINT, termed GEOINT2 in this report. It is within this context that the National Academies was asked by NGA to identify research priorities and strategic directions in geospatial science for the NGA's Basic and Applied Research Program. The goal of the study was to examine both "hard problems" in geospatial science that must be addressed to improve geospatial intelligence, and promising methods and tools in geospatial science and related disciplines to pursue in order to resolve these problems. The results of this study are intended to help NGA's chief scientist to anticipate and prioritize geospatial science research directions and, by doing so, to enhance NGA's mix of research as it addresses these priorities.

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