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Measuring and sustaining the new economy [electronic resource] : software, growth, and the future of the U.S. economy : report of a symposium / Dale W. Jorgenson and Charles W. Wessner, editors ; Committee on Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy, Committee on Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy, Board of Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs, National Research Council of the National Academies.

Contributor(s): Jorgenson, Dale W. (Dale Weldeau), 1933- | Wessner, Charles W | National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy | National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, c2006Description: 1 online resource (xxi, 203 p.) : ill.ISBN: 030965310X (electronic bk.); 9780309653107 (electronic bk.); 128056752X; 9781280567520.Other title: Software, growth, and the future of the U.S. economy.Subject(s): Technological innovations -- Economic aspects -- United States | Computer programs -- Economic aspects -- United States | Economic development | United States -- Economic conditions -- 21st century | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING -- Industrial TechnologyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Software, growth, and the future of the U.S. economy.DDC classification: 338/.0640973 Online resources: ebrary | EBSCOhost | MyiLibrary | National Academies Press | Table of contents | MyiLibrary, Table of contents
Contents:
Proceedings -- Introduction / Dale W. Jorgenson -- The Economics of Software / William J. Raduchel -- Panel I: The Role of Software. What Does Software Do? / moderator: Dale W. Jorgenson -- [no unique title] / Anthony Scott -- Panel II: How Do We Make Software and Why Is It Unique? / moderators: Dale W. Jorgenson, James Socas -- How Do We Make It? / Monica Lam -- Open-Source Software / Hal R. Varian -- Making Software Secure and Reliable / Kenneth Walker -- Panel III: Software Measurement: What Do We Track Today? / moderator: Kenneth Flamm -- Measuring Prices of Prepackaged Software / Alan G. White, Ernst R. Berndt -- Accounting Rules: What Do They Capture and What Are the Problems? / Shelly C. Luisi, Greg Beams -- A BEA Perspective: Private Fixed Software Investment / David Wasshausen -- What Is in the OECD Accounts and How Good Is It? / Dirk Pilat -- Panel IV: Moving Off-shore: The Software Labor Force and the U.S. Economy / moderator: Mark B. Myers -- Hiring Software Talent / Wayne Rosing -- Current Trends and Implications: An Industry View / Jack Harding -- Implications of Offshoring and National Policy / Ronil Hira -- Offshoring Policy Options / William B. Bonvillian -- Panel V: Participants' Roundtable: Where Do We Go from Here? Policy Issues? / moderator: William J. Raduchel ; Wayne Rosing, Kenneth Flamm, Ernst R. Berndt, James Socas, Ronil Hira -- Concluding remarks / Dale W. Jorgenson -- Research Paper: The Economics of Software: Technology, Processes, and Policy Issues / William J. Raduchel.
Summary: Starting in the mid 1990s, the United States economy experienced an unprecedented upsurge in economic productivity. Rapid technological change in communications, computing, and information management continue to promise further gains in productivity, a phenomenon often referred to as the New Economy. To better understand this phenomenon, the National Academies Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) has convened a series of workshops and commissioned papers on Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy. This major workshop, entitled Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy, convened academic experts and industry representatives from leading companies such as Google and General Motors to participate in a high-level discussion of the role of software and its importance to U.S. productivity growth; how software is made and why it is unique; the measurement of software in national and business accounts; the implications of the movement of the U.S. software industry offshore; and related policy issues.
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Proceedings -- Introduction / Dale W. Jorgenson -- The Economics of Software / William J. Raduchel -- Panel I: The Role of Software. What Does Software Do? / moderator: Dale W. Jorgenson -- [no unique title] / Anthony Scott -- Panel II: How Do We Make Software and Why Is It Unique? / moderators: Dale W. Jorgenson, James Socas -- How Do We Make It? / Monica Lam -- Open-Source Software / Hal R. Varian -- Making Software Secure and Reliable / Kenneth Walker -- Panel III: Software Measurement: What Do We Track Today? / moderator: Kenneth Flamm -- Measuring Prices of Prepackaged Software / Alan G. White, Ernst R. Berndt -- Accounting Rules: What Do They Capture and What Are the Problems? / Shelly C. Luisi, Greg Beams -- A BEA Perspective: Private Fixed Software Investment / David Wasshausen -- What Is in the OECD Accounts and How Good Is It? / Dirk Pilat -- Panel IV: Moving Off-shore: The Software Labor Force and the U.S. Economy / moderator: Mark B. Myers -- Hiring Software Talent / Wayne Rosing -- Current Trends and Implications: An Industry View / Jack Harding -- Implications of Offshoring and National Policy / Ronil Hira -- Offshoring Policy Options / William B. Bonvillian -- Panel V: Participants' Roundtable: Where Do We Go from Here? Policy Issues? / moderator: William J. Raduchel ; Wayne Rosing, Kenneth Flamm, Ernst R. Berndt, James Socas, Ronil Hira -- Concluding remarks / Dale W. Jorgenson -- Research Paper: The Economics of Software: Technology, Processes, and Policy Issues / William J. Raduchel.

Starting in the mid 1990s, the United States economy experienced an unprecedented upsurge in economic productivity. Rapid technological change in communications, computing, and information management continue to promise further gains in productivity, a phenomenon often referred to as the New Economy. To better understand this phenomenon, the National Academies Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) has convened a series of workshops and commissioned papers on Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy. This major workshop, entitled Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy, convened academic experts and industry representatives from leading companies such as Google and General Motors to participate in a high-level discussion of the role of software and its importance to U.S. productivity growth; how software is made and why it is unique; the measurement of software in national and business accounts; the implications of the movement of the U.S. software industry offshore; and related policy issues.

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Measuring and sustaining the new economy ©2006
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