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Red-hot and righteous [electronic resource] : the urban religion of the Salvation Army / Diane Winston.

By: Winston, Diane H, 1951-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1999Description: 1 online resource (290 p.) : ill.ISBN: 0674045262 (electronic bk.); 9780674045262 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Salvation Army -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | Sociology, Urban -- United States | Salvation Army -- United States -- History | Salvation Army -- United States -- Influence | RELIGION -- Christianity -- Methodist | Leger des Heils | Heilsarmee | Geschichte 1880-1950 | New York (Staat)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Red-hot and righteous.DDC classification: 287.9/6/097471 Other classification: 11.55 Online resources: ebrary | EBSCOhost | Google Review: "In this engrossing study of religion, urban life, and commercial culture, Diane Winston shows how a (self-styled "red-hot") militant Protestant mission established a beachhead in the modern city. When The Salvation Army, a British evangelical movement, landed in New York in 1880, local citizens called its eye-catching advertisements "vulgar" and dubbed its brass bands, female preachers, and overheated services "sensationalist." Yet a little more than a century later this ragtag missionary movement had evolved into the nation's largest charitable fund-raiser - the very exemplar of America's most cherished values of social service and religious commitment." "Winston illustrates how the Army borrowed the forms and idioms of popular entertainments, commercial emporiums, and master marketers to deliver its message. In contrast to histories that relegate religion to the sidelines of urban society, she shows that Salvationists were at the center of debates about social services for the urban poor, the changing position of women, and the evolution of a consumer culture."--Jacket.
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [255]-278) and index.

"In this engrossing study of religion, urban life, and commercial culture, Diane Winston shows how a (self-styled "red-hot") militant Protestant mission established a beachhead in the modern city. When The Salvation Army, a British evangelical movement, landed in New York in 1880, local citizens called its eye-catching advertisements "vulgar" and dubbed its brass bands, female preachers, and overheated services "sensationalist." Yet a little more than a century later this ragtag missionary movement had evolved into the nation's largest charitable fund-raiser - the very exemplar of America's most cherished values of social service and religious commitment." "Winston illustrates how the Army borrowed the forms and idioms of popular entertainments, commercial emporiums, and master marketers to deliver its message. In contrast to histories that relegate religion to the sidelines of urban society, she shows that Salvationists were at the center of debates about social services for the urban poor, the changing position of women, and the evolution of a consumer culture."--Jacket.

Description based on print version record.

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Red-hot and righteous by Winston, Diane H., ©1999
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